Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Time is on WAG's side with screening of The Clock

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THE prospect of clock-watching has never been so tantalizing.

For movie lovers and art lovers both, the event of this year's art season may be Christian Marclay's The Clock, a 24-hour film that unfolds in real time, consisting of some 10,000 clips culled from the entire history of cinema and television that make reference to a particular time of day. The film itself thus acts as a clock, marking each minute of passing time synced to a time-specific film clip.

The Winnipeg Art Gallery acquired the work, winner of the Golden Lion award at the 2011 Venice Biennale, as part of the WAG's three-year partnership with the National Gallery of Canada.

The WAG will screen the film for its entire 24-hour running time in one of its designated galleries beginning 6 p.m. on Nov, 1, beginning 9 a.m. on Nov. 22 and beginning at 6 p.m. on Dec. 31. Approximately 50 seats will be set up for visitors.

Otherwise, it will partially screen during regular gallery hours.

"I saw The Clock in Los Angeles in 2011 and then in Ottawa in 2012 -- and it blew me away," says WAG director Stephen Borys. "The first time, I had planned to watch it for 20 minutes and ended up staying for two hours.

"Visitors should be prepared to stay long and return a few times to really take in this cinematic masterpiece."

Admittance to The Clock exhibit comes with regular gallery admission.

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition September 27, 2013 G2

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