Winnipeg Free Press - ONLINE EDITION

Paper Chase: Tracz translation at the Louvre

  • Print

VISITORS to the Louvre this winter will be able to take home a little bit of Winnipeg.

Last summer, retired Winnipeg librarian Orysia Tracz translated an illustrated book on Johann-Georg Pinzell, a sculptor known as the Michelangelo of Ukraine, written by scholar and museum curator Vira Stetsko.

In September, Tracz learned that the bilingual book ( Tayina Pinzelia/Pinzel’s Mystery) was to be featured at the famed Paris art gallery this winter during a three-month exhibition on the artist, who is known for Rococo statues and bas reliefs in churches throughout western Ukraine. The exhibition opened Nov. 23.

 

* * *

 

Yann Martel isn’t the only Canadian author with a movie jockeying for attention during the end-of-the-year awards season.

Ontario writer Craig Davidson’s 2005 short-story collection Rust and Bone has been adapted loosely into a French film with the same title starring Marion Cotillard (The Dark Knight Rises, Inception).

On the film’s website, Davidson discusses the changes made by director Jacques Audiard and admits that, far from taking away from his vision, they have made the film better than the book. Rust and Bone opened in New York Nov. 23 and Los Angeles Dec. 7.

 

* * *

 

Lac Du Bonnet writer Donna Besel won first place in one of Canada’s longest-lasting literary competitions this fall.

Besel won first prize in the 16th annual creative non-fiction category of The Great Canadian Literary Hunt, held by Torontobased This Magazine. Her winning entry, Fare Well, was published in the magazine’s November-December issue.

 

* * *

 

A woman’s hiking memoir and the story of a harrowing climbing accident were the big winners in this year’s U.S. National Outdoor Book Awards.

Suzanne Roberts’s Almost Somewhere: Twenty Eight Days on the John Muir Trail (University of Nebraska Press), shared first prize in the outdoor literature category for its depiction of a group of women hiking and sharing life stories along the trail. The John Muir Trail is part of the high-elevation section of the Pacific Crest Trail that author Cheryl Strayed had to detour around in her bestselling hiking memoir Wild.

The other outdoor lit winner was The Ledge (Ballantine Books), by Jim Davidson and Kevin Vaughn, which tells of a disastrous climb on Washington’s Mount Rainier.

 

* * *

 

A Canadian comic book writer has a big hit on the crowd-funding website Kickstarter, where he’s raising money to publish a new, illustrated twist on Hamlet.

Ryan North says in a video on Kickstarter that he’s already written the 80,000-word text for To Be or Not to Be: That Is the Adventure, a "chooseable-path adventure" in which readers can follow Hamlet, Ophelia or King Hamlet through a variety of comical storylines. He’s also recruited a team of illustrators, including Kate Beaton ( Hark: A Vagrant) and Mathew Inman ( The Oatmeal).

By Dec. 1, North had attracted pledges worth more than seven times his $20,000 fundraising goal, with nearly three weeks to go before the Dec. 20 deadline.

 

booknewsbob@gmail.com

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Public finally sees inside the Museum for Human Rights

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • Marc Gallant / Winnipeg Free Press.  Local/Weather Standup- Catching rays. Prairie Dog stretches out at Fort Whyte Centre. Fort Whyte has a Prairie Dog enclosure with aprox. 20 dogs young and old. 060607.
  • A goose cools off Thursday in water at Omands Creek Park-See Bryksa 30 day goose challenge- Day 25– June 21, 2012   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Should the Canadian Museum for Human Rights use the word 'genocide' in exhibits on Indian residential schools?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google