Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Location, location, location

With more movies choices in an idyllic setting, Gimli Film Festival is a cinephile’s Emerald City

  • Print

PERHAPS the perfect embodiment of this year’s Gimli Film Festival is its last screening on the beach.

In the festival program, it’s titled Dark Side of the Rainbow. It is the celebrated mash-up of The Wizard of Oz coupled with an eerily appropriate soundtrack consisting of Pink Floyd’s exercise in ’70s psychedelia Dark Side of the Moon.

It’s a nice blend of pop and esoterica representative of GFF. The fest has always struck a blend between crowd-pleasers (usually at the free nightly beach screenings) and more challenging art films, in addition to a component of industry sessions and filmmaker-friendly seminars.

Taking over as programmer this year is Aaron Zeghers, himself an underground filmmaker with a history of programming as the founder of the Open City Film Collective and the Winnipeg Underground Film Festival.

Zeghers says the festival has gone through some changes, but film fans can expect even more choices than usual in 2014. For example, if you don’t feel like seeing, say, A River Runs Through It at the beach screening on Thursday night, you might catch the Canucksploitation comedy WolfCop at the Gimli Theatre or the celebrated Canadian doc Watermark at either the Lady of the Lake or Aspire theatres.

"We’ve created a lot of screenings intended as an alternative to the beach screenings," Zeghers says.

While he may describe himself as an underground filmmaker, Zeghers has been a fan of the sun-soaked Lake Winnipeg venue since he screened his first film there years ago.

"It’s such an ideal location for a film festival," he says. "You can walk everywhere and it’s a beautiful setting."

A large component of this year’s offerings are international art films that have already played in Winnipeg, such as Finding Vivian Maier, Tim’s Vermeer and Gloria, and Canadian films including Special Ed , Empire of Dirt and Gabrielle.

Zeghers says the fest does serve the Gimli and Interlake community with films that aren’t as readily accessible to them.

This year, they go a step further with a new event at the Gimli Pavilion, Movie Music and a Meal (Thursday at 4 p.m.) The CBC documentary Oli’s Gift, a film about legendary Gimli builder and violin maker Oli Thorsteinson, will be screened. The $20 admission includes a barbecue and live music entertainment. "It’s an all-night affair geared towards local residents," Zeghers says.

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition July 22, 2014 C1

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Public finally sees inside the Museum for Human Rights

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • A one day old piglet glances up from his morning feeding at Cedar Lane Farm near Altona.    Standup photo Ruth Bonneville Winnipeg Free Press
  • Aerial view of Portage and Main, The Esplanade Riel, Provencher Bridge over the Red River, The Canadian Museum for Human Rights and The Forks near the Assiniboine River, October 21st, 2011. (TREVOR HAGAN/WINNIPEG FREE PRESS) CMHR

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Should the Canadian Museum for Human Rights use the word 'genocide' in exhibits on Indian residential schools?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google