Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Hader shares his love of old flicks on TCM

  • Print

GROWING up in Tulsa, Okla., Bill Hader became obsessed with movies.

"I would watch movies at night with my family and go to the movie theatre," said the former Saturday Night Live funnyman. "That was my existence."

Hader, 35, especially enjoyed movie nights with his father, who would wake him up after the late news.

"He would let me come down and watch them with him -- whatever was on Cinemax or HBO," said Hader, admitting maybe these films were a bit too sophisticated for a youngster.

"I remember The Wild Bunch and Clockwork Orange. I had never seen anything like Clockwork Orange before. I remember being in fifth grade and watching Taxi Driver at night and it totally changing my world. Just going 'What is this?' "

Hader, the father of two young daughters, was about 13 when he became enthralled with old movies. "I remember when AMC was playing a night of Marx Brothers movies and watching them with my dad," said Hader, who also has fond memories of the award-winning 1953 western Shane and the Charles Laughton 1939 version of The Hunchback of Notre Dame.

Watching movies, he added, was and still is a "comfort thing. Before I go to bed, I watch a movie. That's my way of unwinding."

Hader's been sharing his passion for films on Turner Classic Movies.

The comedian, who has segued into acting -- he earned strong notices at Sundance for the drama The Skeleton Twins, which co-starred SNL pal Kristen Wiig -- approached TCM a few years ago to see if he could be a guest programmer.

His enthusiasm for cinema didn't go unnoticed by the TCM executives. Shortly after his evening as guest programmer with host Robert Osborne (Hader selected such eclectic films as Billy Wilder's 1943 Five Graves to Cairo; Robert Altman's 1970 Brewster McCloud and Akira Kurosawa's 1950 Rashomon), the cable network asked him if he would like to host its summer Essentials Jr. showcase that introduces younger audiences to seminal movies from the golden age of Hollywood and international cinema.

Charlie Tabesh, senior vice-president of programming for TCM, said Hader is a perfect fit for Essentials Jr. because he has a "certain energy and appeal to younger people. He is very passionate about the subject. He isn't just reading a TelePrompter. He really cares and knows the movies."

He kicked off his fourth year as the host of Essentials Jr. on Sunday evening with Howard Hawks' 1938 screwball comedy Bringing Up Baby, with Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn.

The showcase continues through Aug. 31 with such classics as 1946's The Yearling; the 1944 Alfred Hitchcock thriller Lifeboat; the 1956 version of Godzilla; the 1939 Shirley Temple drama The Little Princess; and an evening of silent classic comedy shorts featuring such giants as Charlie Chaplin, "Fatty" Arbuckle, Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd.

Essentials Jr. programming is a collaborative effort between TCM and Hader. This year, he was eager to show one of his childhood favourites, the 1964 cult comedy The Incredible Mr. Limpet, starring Don Knotts as a milquetoast morphing into a talking fish.

TCM folks weren't as enthusiastic.

"The producer was like, 'You want to do this movie?' " said Hader, with a laugh. But Hader put forward a persuasive argument and got his wish. The movie airs June 8.

"It didn't make a lick of sense," Hader said, remembering when he saw it as a kid. "But I totally enjoyed it."

-- Los Angeles Times

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition June 3, 2014 C9

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Inside peek at Real Pirates, new Manitoba Museum exhibit

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • PHIL.HOSSACK@FREEPRESS.MB.CA 090728 / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS White Pelicans belly up to the sushi bar Tuesday afternoon at Lockport. One of North America's largest birds is a common sight along the Red RIver and on Lake Winnipeg. Here the fight each other for fish near the base of Red RIver's control structure, giving human fisher's downstream a run for their money.
  • Winnipeg’s best friend the dragon fly takes a break at English Gardens in Assiniboine Park Wednesday- A dragon fly can eat  food equal to its own weight in 30 minutes-Standup photo- June 13, 2012   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Has the attack on Parliament hill shaken your faith in Canada's ability to protect its citizens from terrorist threats?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google