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Food & Drink

Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

A bread winner

A simple dough baked traditionally over coals

Posted: 07/13/2013 1:00 AM | Comments: 0

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Few may remember home-baked bread fresh out of the oven and patiently waiting for it to cool so you could cut a doughy slice and slather it in butter. Nowadays the aroma wafts from smaller bakeries and torments us as we walk by.

Well, you too can treat your family and guests to bread fresh off the barbecue, and believe me, it is a lot easier than it sounds.

Call it bannock, soda bread, griddle cakes or naan, but our ancestors knew how to make bread in many, now forgotten ways.

This recipe is South African where the weather permits year-round barbecuing, or braai as it is known, and is so much a way of life there.

Known as roosterkoek, (translated as griddle cakes, but not the North American version) it is a simple bread dough baked traditionally over glowing wood coals.

Make sure you have butter on hand to round off the final product.

Serve plain or with grated cheddar cheese drizzled with honey. Use it as a bun for your burger or break it into chucks and dip it in olive oil and balsamic. Enjoy with a light lager or English ale.

1 l (4 cups) all-purpose flour

5 ml (1 tsp) baking soda

5 ml (1 tsp) cream of tartar

5 ml (1 tsp) salt

60 ml (4 tbsp) butter

375 ml (1 2/3 cups) buttermilk

 

1. Sift the dry ingredients together and rub in the butter.

2. Add the buttermilk and mix to a stiff dough.

3. Put dough onto floured board and cut into equal pieces and shape into flattened rolls.

4. Leave to rise until double the size, about 15 minutes.

5. Grill on the barbecue, turning until browned on the outside and sounds hollow in the middle.

6. Split and serve warm with butter.

 

Tip: Replace baking soda and cream of tartar with 20 ml (4 tsp) of baking powder, if preferred.

Variation: Add some grated cheese to the dry ingredients to make cheesy buns.

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition July 13, 2013 D14

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