Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

A French connection

  • Print
Tarte Flambe Pizza also called Northern French Pizza. Basic pizza dough, bacon, caramelized onions, cheese and cooked in a pizza oven.

RUTH BONNEVILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS Enlarge Image

Tarte Flambe Pizza also called Northern French Pizza. Basic pizza dough, bacon, caramelized onions, cheese and cooked in a pizza oven. Photo Store

Red River College recently signed an agreement with the Institut Paul Bocuse in France. The institute is named after the French chef based in Lyon, famous for the high quality of his restaurants and his innovative approaches to cuisine. He is one of the most prominent chefs associated with the nouvelle cuisine, which is less opulent and calorific than the traditional cuisine classique, and stresses the importance of fresh ingredients of the highest quality.

At 87, Mr. Bocuse lives above one of his restaurants and still goes down every evening to greet the guests.

The agreement will allow students from the School of Hospitality and Culinary Arts to continue their studies in France both at the institute or one of their restaurants. Red River College is also the only Canadian partner in the alliance that includes the top 14 culinary schools from around the world.

If you thought I was going to give you a recipe for beef bourguignon or French onion soup, you are wrong. I want to share with you a simple recipe from the Alsace region, which borders Germany. Somewhat resembling pizza without the tomato sauce, the smoky bacon and onion makes sure this goes with a Riesling or Weissbier.

 

Tarte Flambé

 

FOR THE DOUGH

2 g (1/2 tsp) instant yeast

2 g (1/2 tsp) sugar

125 ml (1/2 cup) plus 30 ml (2 tbsp) warm water

375 ml (1 1/2 cups) all-purpose flour, plus more for work surface

4 ml (3/4 tsp) coarse salt

Olive oil, for bowl

 

FOR THE TOPPING

300 g (2/3 lb) thick-cut bacon, cut into 1/2-inch pieces

2 large yellow onions, julienned

Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper

125 ml (1/2 cup) crème fraiche

1 g (1/4 tsp) ground coriander

75 g (2 1/2 oz) Comté or Gruyère cheese, finely grated

15 ml (1 tbsp) packed fresh thyme leaves

 

DIRECTIONS

 

1. In a medium bowl, combine yeast, flour, sugar and salt. Stir in water with a wooden spoon until a rough dough is formed. Knead on a lightly floured work surface until dough is slightly tacky. Do not use too much flour while kneading.

2. Lightly oil a large bowl. Place the dough in a bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Leave to rest in a warm place until nearly doubled in size, 1 to 1 1/2 hours.

3. Place a pizza stone on the bottom rack of the oven. Preheat oven to 250 C (475 F) for at least 45 minutes.

4. To make the topping: Place bacon in a medium skillet and cook over medium-high heat, stirring, until lightly browned and crispy, about 7 minutes. Remove the bacon to a paper towel-lined plate and set aside.

5. Drain the bacon fat, leaving 1 tablespoon in the skillet. Add onions and season with salt and pepper; cook, stirring occasionally, until soft and translucent, about 12 minutes. Remove onions from heat and set aside to cool.

6. In a small bowl, mix together crème fraiche and coriander; season with salt and pepper. Set aside.

7. Back to the dough. Punch it down and divide into 4 equal pieces. Working with one piece of dough at a time (keep the rest covered), roll out dough on a lightly floured work surface into a rectangle about 25 centimetres by 20 centimetres (10 inches by 8 inches), stretching with fingers if necessary

8. Transfer dough to the back of a lightly floured baking sheet.

9. Spread one-quarter of the crème fraiche mixture evenly over dough, spreading as close to the edge as possible. Top with one-quarter of the bacon, onions, cheese and thyme.

10. Gently shake tarte on the baking sheet to ensure that it will slide easily onto pizza stone. Open oven door and align the front of the baking sheet with the back of the stone; quickly jerk the baking sheet backward to release tarte onto the stone. Bake, rotating with a large spatula halfway through, until crust is crispy and golden, 8 to 10 minutes.

11. Remove tarte from oven. Cut into squares and serve immediately.

12. Repeat with the remaining dough.

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition January 11, 2014 D14

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Chief justices breakdown cameras in courtroom project

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • A monarch butterfly looks for nectar in Mexican sunflowers at Winnipeg's Assiniboine Park Monday afternoon-Monarch butterflys start their annual migration usually in late August with the first sign of frost- Standup photo– August 22, 2011   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)
  • Young goslings are growing up quickly near Cresent Lake in Portage La Prairie, Manitoba- See Bryksa 30 Day goose project- Day 11- May 15, 2012   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Do you think Manitoba needs stronger regulations for temporary workers?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google