Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Crème fraîche

  • Print

What is it?

Translated from French, crème fraîche means "fresh cream." Traditionally, it was a heavy, unpasteurized cream that came from freshly milked cows and had been soured by bacterial culture. These days, the term more commonly refers to a specific kind of thick, rich, pasteurized cream produced in a factory that is lightly acidulated through controlled ripening.

Looks like:

Crème fraîche looks like sour cream, or maybe Greek yogurt -- thick, off-white and creamy. But where sour cream is made from cream that's around 20 per cent fat, crème fraîche is more like 30 per cent butterfat.

Tastes like:

Unlike its sour cousin, crème fraîche is rich and tart. The hint of acidity gives it a refreshing flavour. As of byproduct of the added bacteria that helped create it, it tends to make other foods taste buttery.

Used in:

In its native France, it's commonly used in sauces, salad dressings, soups and pastries, and as a topping for fresh fruit. It can also be spooned on to pancakes and waffles. Some people also like to whip it with a little powdered sugar and vanilla for a sweeter topping, or a filling for crepes.

Found at:

Vic's Fruit Market, 1038 Pembina Hwy.

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition May 18, 2013 E4

History

Updated on Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 8:50 AM CDT: corrects spelling of crème fraîche

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Weather for final Fringing weekend

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • Marc Gallant/Winnipeg Free Press. Local- Peregrine Falcon Recovery Project. Baby peregrine falcons. 21 days old. Three baby falcons. Born on ledge on roof of Radisson hotel on Portage Avenue. Project Coordinator Tracy Maconachie said that these are third generation falcons to call the hotel home. Maconachie banded the legs of the birds for future identification as seen on this adult bird swooping just metres above. June 16, 2004.
  • Young goslings jostle for position to take a drink from a puddle in Brookside Cemetery Thursday morning- Day 23– June 14, 2012   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Should the city grant mosquito buffer zones for medical reasons only?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google