Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Crème fraîche

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What is it?

Translated from French, crème fraîche means "fresh cream." Traditionally, it was a heavy, unpasteurized cream that came from freshly milked cows and had been soured by bacterial culture. These days, the term more commonly refers to a specific kind of thick, rich, pasteurized cream produced in a factory that is lightly acidulated through controlled ripening.

Looks like:

Crème fraîche looks like sour cream, or maybe Greek yogurt -- thick, off-white and creamy. But where sour cream is made from cream that's around 20 per cent fat, crème fraîche is more like 30 per cent butterfat.

Tastes like:

Unlike its sour cousin, crème fraîche is rich and tart. The hint of acidity gives it a refreshing flavour. As of byproduct of the added bacteria that helped create it, it tends to make other foods taste buttery.

Used in:

In its native France, it's commonly used in sauces, salad dressings, soups and pastries, and as a topping for fresh fruit. It can also be spooned on to pancakes and waffles. Some people also like to whip it with a little powdered sugar and vanilla for a sweeter topping, or a filling for crepes.

Found at:

Vic's Fruit Market, 1038 Pembina Hwy.

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition May 18, 2013 E4

History

Updated on Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 8:50 AM CDT: corrects spelling of crème fraîche

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