Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Impossible pies? Not so, non-believers!

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A few weeks ago two impossible pie recipes were featured, and I mentioned that I received quite a variety of recipes from readers and would feature more of them.

Numerous readers wrote that they were interested in any additional recipes, and there were also a couple of specific requests. Eleanor Brunette was seeking the impossible pumpkin pie recipe and it is featured today in time for Thanksgiving. Thanks to Lil Olinyk and to Tamara Greenlay of Holland.

One of the earlier recipes featured was an impossible lasagna, and Maxine Geller had asked if there was a vegetarian lasagna in the collection. The closest is a garden vegetable pie, also featured today, thanks to Elsie Reid of The Pas.

Several readers asked if there was a homemade substitution for Bisquick mix, and a popular version of that is also included.

Still on the garden path, Belynda Salter-Oliver is looking for a recipe like the garden burger served at Stella's Cafe. She writes that it has chickpeas and perhaps sunflower seeds and curry, and is topped with chutney and a cilantro sauce.

Leslie Van Norman is a former Winnipegger now living in New Westminster, B.C. and asks if anyone may have the recipe for the borscht that was served at the former Moscovitz and Moscowitz restaurant in the late 1970s and early 1980s.

Josh Nodelman is a former Winnipegger now living in Halifax who would like the recipe for the burritos he used to enjoy at Pure Lard restaurant that was in the Exchange District in the mid 1990s. He recalls that the burritos contained heavily seasoned beef, sour cream and perhaps lettuce, but no cheese, salsa or rice.

Adele Asplund has lost a recipe for diabetic butter tarts and hopes someone else may have the same one. It contains brown SugarTwin, butter, raisins and a small amount of lemon juice. The mixture is heated on the stove and then poured into tart shells.

Joy Toews asks if anyone has a recipe that is like Bellissimo's pollo ripieno. It is a pecan-crusted chicken breast stuffed with asparagus, sun-dried tomatoes, onions and chevre cheese, and topped with a carmelized honey sauce. She writes that she has tried numerous recipes she found online, but none has been a match.

Clayton Kilborn would like a recipe for the onion salad served at Rae and Jerry's, and also puts out another call for the tomato soup that was served at Eaton's. He also would like the recipe for the caesar salad dressing from Partner's Deli, and hopes that a former employee might be able to help.

Lastly, Larry Ober would like a recipe similar to Campbell's old-fashioned tomato rice soup with spinach.

If you can help with a recipe request, have your own request, or a favourite recipe you'd like to share, send an e-mail to recipeswap@freepress.mb.ca, fax it to 697-7412, or write to Recipe Swap, c/o Darlene Henderson, Winnipeg Free Press, 1355 Mountain Ave., Winnipeg, MB, R2X 3B6. Please include your first and last name, address and telephone number.

 

Impossible pumpkin pie

 

2 eggs

175 ml (3/4 cup) sugar

30 ml (2 tbsp) butter

2 ml (1/2 tsp) salt

370 ml (13 oz) can evaporated milk

375 ml (11/2 cups) cooked pumpkin

5 ml (1 tsp) cinnamon

2 ml (1/2 tsp) ground ginger

1 ml (1/4 tsp) ground cloves

1 ml (1/4 tsp) nutmeg

125 ml (1/2 cup) Bisquick baking mix

10 ml (2 tsp) vanilla

 

Measure all ingredients into a blender and blend well at medium speed, or place in a bowl and mix for 4 minutes with electric mixer using high speed.

Pour into greased 25 cm (10-inch) pie plate. Bake at 175 C (350 F) for 1 hour or until it tests done. Serve with whipped cream or ice cream. Serves 6-8.

 

Taste Tester Notes: If you don't want to use a conventional pastry shell, this pumpkin pie recipe is a cinch to make. It is very good, with a smooth consistency that is nicely spiced and not too sweet. I tried one version using Bisquick and another version using the substitute featured today and both worked equally well. The butter is not melted before adding. Once baked, let pie cool to room temperature then cover and refrigerate until serving. The pie will be firm enough, but since this does not have a crust to support it, when ready to serve make sure you get your lifter all the way underneath the slice to prevent any getting left in the pan and it will lift out nicely.

 

Impossible garden vegetable pie

 

500 ml (2 cups) chopped zucchini

250 ml (1 cup) chopped tomato

125 ml (1/2 cup) chopped onion

80 ml (1/3 cup) grated Parmesan cheese

375 ml (11/2 cups) milk

175 ml (3/4 cup) Bisquick baking mix

3 eggs

2 ml (1/2 tsp) salt

1 ml (1/4 tsp) pepper

 

Grease a 25 cm (10-inch) pie plate.

 

Mix vegetables and cheese in pie plate.

Beat remaining ingredients for 15 seconds in blender on high or for 1 minute with hand mixer. Pour into pie plate. Bake at 205 C (400 F) for 30 minutes or until knife inserted in centre comes out clean. Cool 5 minutes before serving.

 

Taste Tester Notes: This is very good, like a light quiche, and is suitable for breakfast, lunch or dinner. My six-year-old son declared it as "10 out of 10." Chop the onion into small pieces (or they may be a bit crunchy) or pre-cook in the microwave just until soft before adding. The version in the photograph was made using Bisquick, and I made another version that turned out equally as well using the substitute. For the substitute mix in this pie I experimented using whole-wheat flour instead of white, and canola oil instead of shortening, and was pleased with the results. The whole-wheat flour gave the pie a darker colour overall and added a bit of nuttiness to the taste.

 

Bisquick substitute

 

250 ml (1 cup) flour

7 ml (11/2 tsp) baking powder

2 ml (1/2 tsp) salt

15 ml (1 tbsp) shortening (such as Crisco)

 

Stir dry ingredients together. Blend in shortening with a fork until in very small crumbs. Store in fridge.

 

Taste Tester Notes: Very simple to mix up as needed. I tried using it in place of Bisquick for several impossible pie recipes with success, and have also used canola oil in place of the shortening with success. I also tried a version using whole-wheat flour and canola oil for the impossible garden vegetable pie and was happy with the results (the whole wheat flour will give it a darker appearance throughout, and adds a bit of nuttiness to the taste).

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition October 7, 2009 D4

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