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Ice Pops recipes

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HERE are three recipes for mouth-watering ice pops created by Andrew Chase for his cookbook 200 Best Ice Pop Recipes (Robert Rose).

Raspberry Meringue Ice Pops

Italian meringue is a cooked meringue with a thick, silky texture. It is often used as a base for European-style sorbets, but here it is used in sweet and smooth ice pops.

2 egg whites

Pinch cream of tartar

150 ml (2/3 cup) granulated sugar

50 ml (1/4 cup) water

500 ml (2 cups) thawed frozen raspberries

 

You can replace the frozen raspberries with 625 ml (2 1/2 cups) fresh berries. Place in a saucepan over medium heat with 30 ml (2 tbsp) water and 15 ml (1 tbsp) granulated sugar. Cook until berries are soft, 3 to 5 minutes. Set aside to cool.

In a large bowl, using electric mixer at high speed, beat egg whites and cream of tartar until stiff but not dry. Set aside.

In a small saucepan over high heat, cook sugar and water until it reaches the large-ball (hard-ball) stage: 121 to 124 C (250 to 255 F) on a candy thermometer or when it forms a hard ball when a little is dropped from a spoon into cold water. Beating constantly, pour syrup in a thin stream into reserved egg whites. Beat at low speed until meringue is cool, 2 to 3 minutes. Set aside.

Place sieve over a large measuring cup and strain raspberries, pressing down and scraping solids with a rubber spatula to extract as much pulp and juice as possible. Discard solids. Fold in meringue until thoroughly combined.

Pour into moulds and freeze until slushy, then insert sticks and freeze until solid, at least 4 hours. If you are using an ice pop kit, follow manufacturer's instructions.

Makes about 650 ml (2 2/3 cups), 8 to 10 ice pops.

 

Fudge Ice Pops

These ice pops are rich and chocolate-fudgy, definitely a step up from the commercial treat, but they still retain the youthful spirit of a fun indulgence.

550 ml (2 1/4 cups) milk

15 ml (1 tbsp) tapioca flour (tapioca flour is often called tapioca starch. They are identical products)

125 ml (1/2 cup) unsweetened cocoa powder

60 g (2 oz) semisweet chocolate, chopped

175 ml (3/4 cup) sweetened condensed milk

3 ml (3/4 tsp) vanilla extract

 

In a saucepan, whisk together milk and tapioca flour, then whisk in cocoa. Whisking constantly, bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer, stirring often, for 5 minutes. Remove from heat and whisk in chocolate until melted, thoroughly incorporated and smooth. Stir in condensed milk and vanilla. Set aside to cool.

Pour into moulds and freeze until slushy, then insert sticks and freeze until solid, at least 4 hours. If you are using an ice pop kit, follow manufacturer's instructions.

Makes about 750 ml (3 cups), 9 to 12 ice pops.

 

Margarita Ice Pops

When cocktail hour rolls around, serve frozen margarita ice pops. Always use freshly squeezed lemon juice or lime juice in your ice pops; bottled just doesn't compare.

325 ml (1 1/3 cups) water

50 ml (1/4 cup) granulated sugar

2 strips (each 1 by 5 cm/1/2 by 2 inches) lime zest

Pinch salt

150 ml (2/3 cup) freshly squeezed lime juice

45 ml (3 tbsp) gold or white tequila

22 ml (1 1/2 tbsp) orange liqueur (such as Cointreau or Triple Sec)

 

In a small saucepan, combine water, sugar, lime zest and salt. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 2 minutes. Pour into a measuring cup and set aside to cool. Discard lime zest. Stir in lime juice, tequila and liqueur.

Pour into moulds and freeze until slushy, then insert sticks and freeze until solid, at least 4 hours or preferably overnight. If you are using an ice pop kit, follow manufacturer's instructions.

Makes about 550 ml (2 1/4 cups), 6 to 9 ice pops.

 

-- The Canadian Press

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition August 7, 2013 ??65535

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