Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Tangy taste put to the test

  • Print

PASTA ALLA PUTTANESCA

Ask Graham Blom what he wants to do and he will tell you he wants to work and travel in Italy.

Graham is soon to graduate from the culinary arts program at Red River College, and what an opportunity awaits him!

For one of his exams he decided to follow through on that love for Italian food and make Pasta alla Puttanesca.

The dish doesn't have a very flattering name, as it translates into Whore's Pasta. But what's in a name? This pasta with any other name would still taste as good.

Pasta alla puttanesca is a tangy, somewhat salty Italian pasta dish invented in the mid-20th century. The ingredients are typical of southern Italian cuisine: tomatoes, olive oil, olives, capers and garlic. Many accounts of its origin are out there, but it seems to have surfaced in 1960 and reportedly made from what was left over at the end of a long night when Chef Petti still had customers to feed. They were reportedly drunk so I'm sure anything would have tasted good. "Facci una puttanata qualsiasi (Make any kind of garbage)."

PASTA ALLA PUTTANESCA

Ingredients

2 cooked chicken breasts

45 ml (3 tbsp) olive oil

8 anchovies (drained and finely chopped)

2 cloves garlic (peeled and finely sliced, crushed or grated)

2.5 ml (1/2 tsp) dried chili flakes (or 30 ml pickled red jalapeno chili peppers, drained, sliced and diced)

500 g (1.1 lbs) spaghetti

1 x 400 g (14 oz) can chopped tomatoes

150 g (51/4 oz) pitted black olives (chopped a bit)

30 ml (2 tbsp) small capers (rinsed and drained)

45 ml (3 tbsp) chopped fresh parsley and basil

salt

pepper

METHOD

Put water for pasta on to boil.

Pour the oil into frying pan, casserole or wok, and put on a medium heat.

Add the finely chopped anchovies and cook for about 3 minutes, pressing and pushing with a wooden spoon, until the anchovies have almost "melted," then add the garlic and chili flakes and cook, stirring for another minute.

Add the pasta to the boiling salted water.

To the sauce, add the tomatoes, olives and capers and cook for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Season to taste.

When the pasta is cooked, drain and add the spaghetti to the sauce, adding a little reserved pasta water to help combine the sauce.

Sprinkle with chopped parsley and basil and serve with the chicken breast sliced on top.

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition November 2, 2013 D16

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Doug Speirs trains for role in Nutcracker

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • A Yellow-bellied Sapsucker hangs out on a birch tree in St. Vital. The Yellow-bellied Sapsucker is considered a keystone species. Other species take advantage of the holes that the birds make in trees. A group of sapsuckers are collectively known as a
  • JOE.BRYKSA@FREEPRESS.MB.CA Local-(Standup photo)- Humming Around- A female ruby -throated hummingbird fly's through the bee bomb  flowers Friday at the Assiniboine Park English Garden- Nectar from flowers are their main source of food. Hummingbirds wings can beat as fast as 75x times second. Better get a glimpse of them soon the birds fly far south for the winter - from Mexico to South America- JOE BRYKSA/WINNIPEG FREE PRESS- Sept 10, 2009

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Now that former cabinet minister Theresa Oswald has entered the NDP leadership race, do you believe the "gang of five" rebel ministers were right to publicly criticize Premier Greg Selinger's leadership?

View Results

Ads by Google