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Tips for preparing and cooking with wild game

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Hunted wild game requires specialized knowledge of how to process the meat, but for the farmed wild game available to consumers, all that's required is a sense of adventure.

Most wild game purchased commercially should not require any additional trimming.

Meats packaged in air-tight vacuum packs, with thick, freezer-grade plastics, are the best for long-term storing. Meat sealed in this manner will stay fresh for one year or more without risk of freezer burn or frost damage.

Appetizers are a great way to introduce non-wild game eaters to something new, a little bite at a time.

Asian flavours go well with most wild game and help mask the gamey quality some people do not like. But be careful not to overdo the soy sauce, teriyaki or other salty sauces.

Wild goose meat can be tough, but commercial meat tenderizers and moist, slow cooking methods allow for the eventual softening of the meat. Cover the goose with bacon slices or cheesecloth dipped in melted butter to keep it from drying out.

For steaks or similar cuts, the pointed side of a meat mallet beat against both sides will break down tough fibres and tenderize the meat.

If you don't have a deep-fry thermometer when using cooking oil to deep-fry game meat, drop a popcorn kernel into the oil. When it pops, the oil is at the right temperature.

Source: "Canadian Wild Game Cookbook" by Jeff Morrison (Company's Coming, 2014).

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