Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Brown 'created the modern woman'

  • Print

NEW YORK -- Before there was Sex and the City, there was Sex and the Single Girl. And before there was Carrie Bradshaw, there was Helen Gurley Brown.

True, Carrie, the fun-loving and fashionable sex columnist of the HBO series, was fictional. But such was the influence of Brown, the long-serving Cosmopolitan editor (and Sex and the Single Girl author) who died Monday at age 90, that her admirers reached into pop culture as well as recent American history to describe her importance.

"Carrie and her friends couldn't have lived the lives they did without Helen," said Bonnie Fuller, the celebrity editor who succeeded Brown at Cosmopolitan in 1997. "She was the first woman to say you could have it all -- and by that she meant a career AND a man AND a hot sex life. She was a visionary. She created the modern woman."

And why limit talk of her influence to the United States? "Hers has been a liberating message for women in other countries, too," said Kate White, current editor of Cosmopolitan. "It's about choice -- choosing the life you want, and not worrying about what people think."

And, well, having fun -- in the bedroom, to be precise. After all, why should sex be fun only for men? Brown's motto was emblazoned on a pillow in her office, says White: "Good girls go to heaven," it said. "Bad girls go everywhere."

White recalled on Monday that she was in high school when her mother gave her a gift: Sex and the Single Girl, Brown's million-selling 1962 advice book on how to get a man (and enjoy doing it.) Mom was quick to advise the young Kate that she should skip over the saucy tips. But she knew her daughter wanted to be in publishing. "She's a blueprint for you," Mom said.

It wasn't just women who were hailing Brown as a visionary, of course: New York City's Mayor Michael Bloomberg called her "a pioneer who reshaped not only the entire media industry, but the nation's culture. She was a role model for the millions of women whose private thoughts, wonders and dreams she addressed so brilliantly in print."

And none other than Hugh Hefner called her "a very important and independent voice related to the changing of women's' roles."

In a telephone interview, the Playboy founder and publisher said he first met Brown, who later became a good friend, in a phone call after she wrote Sex and the Single Girl. Brown was interested in creating what Hefner called a women's version of Playboy; Hefner felt he was too busy. A few years later in 1965, when she was hired by Hearst Magazines to revamp the lagging Cosmopolitan, Hefner gave her advice, he said. (He takes a little credit for Brown's famous 1972 Burt Reynolds nude centerfold, saying it was a nod to his magazine.)

Though Brown featured big-haired women with deep cleavage on her covers, she herself was a tiny, almost frail-looking woman, 5 feet 4 and about 100 pounds -- a weight she maintained through vigorous diet and exercise.

"You can't be sexual at 60 if you're fat," she observed on her 60th birthday. Or wrinkled, apparently: She spoke freely of her own multiple cosmetic surgeries, including a nose job, facelifts and silicone injections.

She said at the outset that her aim was to tell a reader "how to get everything out of life -- the money, recognition, success, men, prestige, authority, dignity -- whatever she is looking at through the glass her nose is pressed against."

Some say today that Brown was the essence of a feminist. Fuller, who now edits Hollywood Life, is one: "She let women know they could have satisfaction in their lives."

-- The Associated Press

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition August 15, 2012 D1

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

HSC ready for Ebola

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • Hay bales sit under a rainbow just west of Winnipeg Saturday, September 3, 2011.(John Woods/Winnipeg Free Press)
  • PHIL HOSSACK / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS 070619 LIGHTNING ILLUMINATES AN ABANDONED GRAIN ELEVATOR IN THE VILLAGE OF SANFORD ABOUT 10PM TUESDAY NIGHT AS A LINE OF THUNDERSTORMS PASSED NEAR WINNIPEG JUST TO THE NORTH OF THIS  SITE.

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Who will you vote for in Wednesday's mayoral race?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google