The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

Greenpeace ship Arctic Sunrise on its way back to Amsterdam after Russian ordeal

  • Print

MOSCOW - The Greenpeace ship Arctic Sunrise departed for the Netherlands on Friday nearly a year after Russian authorities seized it during a protest against an oil platform, the Amsterdam-based environmental group said.

The Arctic Sunrise left the northern Russian port city of Murmansk and was headed to Amsterdam, Greenpeace International said.

The ship was seized by Russian authorities in September 2013 during a protest against the offshore oil platform, and the 30 people on board were arrested, including two Canadians. Greenpeace opposes the location of the platform, within the Arctic Circle.

The crew and journalists were initially charged with piracy and were held in Russian prisons for months after their arrest near the Prirazlomnaya platform. The charges were later downgraded to hooliganism and they were eventually released shortly before the Sochi Olympics.

Russian authorities notified Greenpeace in early June the ship was to be released, and captain Daniel Rizzotti was allowed onboard on June 27. He said it was in need of repairs.

"An ice-breaker like the Arctic Sunrise normally needs daily maintenance," but had been left unattended after its seizure, he said. "In addition, the navigation, communication and safety equipment had been stripped or destroyed."

His crew spent July making necessary repairs.

Greenpeace said the ship will undergo further repairs after arriving in Amsterdam within several days and will then return to use in its campaign against Arctic drilling as soon as possible.

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Gail Asper says museum honours her father’s vision

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • A golfer looks for his ball in a water trap at John Blumberg Golf Course Friday afternoon as geese and goslings run for safety- See Joe Bryksa’s 30 day goose challenge- Day 24– June 15, 2012   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)
  • Marc Gallant/Winnipeg Free Press. Gardening Column- Assiniboine Park English Garden. July 19, 2002.

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Should the Canadian Museum for Human Rights use the word 'genocide' in exhibits on Indian residential schools?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google