The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

Manitoba announces plans to protect woodland caribou and peatland

  • Print

WINNIPEG - The Manitoba government has announced a 10-year strategy that advocates are calling good news for thousands of woodland caribou, which are listed as a threatened species in Canada.

Conservation Minister Gord Mackintosh says the Woodland Caribou Recovery Strategy will include special consideration of the species' boreal habitat.

Woodland caribou were listed as threatened in Manitoba in 2006 under the Endangered Species Act, though their population has since stabilized.

However, the province says they can be affected by things such as habitat destruction from forest fires, habitat fragmentation from poor planning of mines, transmission lines and logging operations, over-hunting and disease.

Resident Ron Spence says he’s happy to see the province come together with First Nations and industry to make it happen.

Ron Thiessen of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society says the province is focusing on high-risk areas on the north and south ends of Lake Winnipeg first.

“The unprecedented commitment to establish large caribou habitat areas that are exempt from forestry is good news for this threatened species," says Thiessen. “We all need the boreal to be healthy as it is the world’s largest source of fresh water, the northern lungs of the planet and its massive carbon stores help to curb climate change.”

The Ottawa-based Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement, which includes seven environmental groups and a number of forestry companies, says the Manitoba government is showing leadership.

"This comprehensive 10-year plan, which exceeds federal standards, puts Manitoba at the forefront of caribou conservation in Canada by ensuring management decisions will balance the demand for boreal forest resources with boreal caribou conservation," says executive director Aran O'Carroll.

In conjunction with the caribou strategy, the government also announced a new Peatlands Stewardship Strategy will include legislation to ensure a balanced approach between the protection and wise use of peatlands.

It will prohibit commercial peat development in provincial parks, wildlife management areas and other sensitive, designated peatlands.

An exception will be made in the Moose Creek wildlife management area, where existing rights are in place.

Mackintosh says peatlands are an important resource for managing the effects of climate change because they are the most efficient, natural place to store carbon while also helping with water resource management, water filtration and biodiversity conservation.

The legislation will also ensure Manitoba peat harvesters file recovery plans for harvested areas and provide security to ensure the plans are carried out.

(The Canadian Press, CJOB)

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Jaws of life used to free two people after two-car collision

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • A water lily in full bloom is reflected in the pond at the Leo Mol Sculpture Garden Tuesday afternoon. Standup photo. Sept 11,  2012 (Ruth Bonneville/Winnipeg Free Press)
  • A black swallowtail butterfly land on Lantana flowers Sunday morning at the Assiniboine Park English Gardens- standup photo – August 14, 2011   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Should Manitoba support the transport of nuclear waste through the province?

View Results

Ads by Google