Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Chocolate found to reduce risk of stroke in men

  • Print

WASHINGTON -- Ladies, don't bogart that chocolate! Pass it on to the men.

A new study finds that compared with men who reported eating little-to-no chocolate on a regular basis, those who had the highest weekly consumption of chocolate -- about 63 grams per week, or just a little more than 2 ounces -- reduced their likelihood of suffering a stroke by 17 per cent.

The latest findings, published in the journal Neurology, are drawn from a population of 37,103 Swedish men, whose age ranged from 45 to 79 at the start of an average follow-up period of about 10 years. The study fills out a picture of chocolate consumption, especially of dark chocolate, that has firmly demonstrated cardiovascular benefits for women. For men, however, research on chocolate's health benefits had been less consistent in its findings.

The Neurology study, released Wednesday, also cites the results of a meta-analysis (a study that pieces together the findings of similar but independent studies) of chocolate consumption and stroke risk in both men and women. That study found that for men and women combined, those who ate the most chocolate drove down their stroke risk by about 19 per cent.

The precise mechanism by which chocolate works such charms is not known. Regular chocolate consumption has been shown to lower blood pressure and improve the health and efficiency of blood vessels.

A food with such powers (it is also considered an aphrodisiac) should be eaten by everyone, right?

Well, not exactly. In addition to being a rich source of flavenoids, chocolate is a rich source of fat and calories. And, to belabour the obvious, taking in too much will cause weight gain, which, in turn, can raise stroke and heart attack risk. Experts suggest that, as with wine -- another highly palatable and potent source of flavenoids -- research like this should offer reassurance to those who already eat chocolate regularly and aren't overweight or obese. But for those looking to reduce stroke risk, eating more fruits, vegetables and legumes is a lower-calorie way to get the same benefits.

-- Los Angeles Times

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition September 1, 2012 G5

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Kenney commends McDonald's on taking action on foreign worker controversy

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • PHIL HOSSACK / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS 070619 LIGHTNING ILLUMINATES AN ABANDONED GRAIN ELEVATOR IN THE VILLAGE OF SANFORD ABOUT 10PM TUESDAY NIGHT AS A LINE OF THUNDERSTORMS PASSED NEAR WINNIPEG JUST TO THE NORTH OF THIS  SITE.
  • MIKE.DEAL@FREEPRESS.MB.CA 100615 - Tuesday, June 15th, 2010 The Mane Attraction - Lions are back at the Assiniboine Park Zoo. Xerxes a 3-year-old male African Lion rests in the shade of a tree in his new enclosure at the old Giant Panda building.  MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Do you agree with the suspensions levied against three bantam hockey players for abusing game officials?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google