Light snow

Winnipeg, MB

1°c Light snow

Full Forecast

Your Health

Health Day - ONLINE EDITION

Grilling Tips to Cut Colon Cancer Risk

Use less red meat, marinate and precook indoors, nutrition expert advises

Posted: 05/11/2013 9:00 AM | Comments: 0

Advertisement

  • Print

SATURDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Simple changes to your backyard grilling routine could help reduce your colon cancer risk, an expert says.

"Research now shows that diets high in red and processed meat increase risk for colon cancer," Alice Bender, a registered dietitian at the American Institute for Cancer Research, said in an institute news release. "And grilling meat -- red or white -- forms potent cancer-causing substances. But by keeping five simple steps in mind, it's possible to make this summer's backyard grilling both healthier and more flavorful."

The type of meat you put on the grill is as important as how you grill it. Diets high in beef, pork and lamb are linked to increased risk for colon cancer, as are processed meats such as hot dogs and sausages. Instead of sticking with steak, burgers and franks, use spices, herbs, hot peppers and sauces to get creative with fish and chicken, Bender suggested.

Be sure to marinate before you grill. Research has shown that marinating meat, poultry and fish for at least 30 minutes before putting it on the grill can reduce the formation of potentially cancer-causing heterocyclic amines (HCAs) that are formed when cooking with high heat. Use a mixture of vinegar, herbs, spices and lemon juice or wine.

Other potentially cancer-causing substances called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are deposited onto meat by smoke during grilling. Reduce the amount of time that meat spends on the grill by first partially cooking it in a microwave, oven or stove. Be sure to put the partially cooked meat on the preheated grill immediately in order to keep it safe from microbes that can cause illness, Bender said.

Cook meat over a low flame to reduce the formation of HCAs and PAHs. Reduce flare-ups by keeping fat and juices out of the fire. Cut visible fat off the meat, move coals to the side of the grill and cook your meat in the center of the grill. Cut off any charred portions of meat before serving.

Your menus should include vegetables and fruits, which contain anti-cancer compounds. Put thick slices of onions, zucchini, eggplant, bell peppers or tomatoes on the grill or in a grill basket. Corn on the cob is another good choice for grilling, which brings out the sweetness in vegetables, Bender said.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more about meats cooked at high temperature and cancer risk.

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories? Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.