Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Let' er ViPR

New resistance-training tool trains many muscles at once

  • Print

The world of fitness is constantly evolving and new fitness products continue to bombard the market. Many of them are gimmicks that come with promises of a new body and the latest quick fix to achieve your fitness goals. But every now and then a really great product comes alone.

The ViPR is a resistance-training tool that takes on a fresh approach to conditioning. Created by kinesiologist Michol Dalcourt, ViPR stands for vitality, performance and reconditioning.

This hollow rubber tube doesn't look like it could be all that challenging, until you try it. The ViPR comes in a range of weights from four to 26 kilograms. The design allows for a wide variety of movements and activities so it can be lifted, flipped, rolled, tilted and rotated in every and all directions. It can be used in the same way as a dumbbell or barbell or in complex, multi-directional movements in which the cylinder pulls the body away from its centre of gravity, requiring a high level of balance and agility to complete the exercise. Every exercise becomes a core exercise.

ViPR bridges the gap between movement and strength training. It combines full-body movement with load, such as, for example, when performing a skating action while holding the ViPR and moving it in the natural skating arm pattern.

Traditional strength-training programs are based on muscle isolation techniques performed while standing, seated or lying still.

The days of training only the biceps or triceps is being replaced with training movement. In training movement you train the entire body.

The term "loaded movement training," coined by the inventor of the ViPR, is now becoming a methodology in conditioning -- providing a unique weighted fitness tool that benefits fitness enthusiasts and athletes.

Loaded movement training combines task-oriented movement patterns with resistance training.

If you grew up on a farm, this type of movement training isn't new to you. In fact, people in occupations that require a high degree of physical labour already do this kind of movement. Farm kids who move with load in daily life inspired the design of the ViPR.

This entirely new exercise category of conditioning is called whole body integration. Instead of working muscles in isolation, this progressive approach to training advocates movements that require the body to work synergistically -- as it does in any "real life" situation outside the weight room.

Agility and strength come from moving the body in a multitude of purposeful tasks with load.

When given more complex, multi-dimensional patterns of movement to complete, the body is forced to recruit muscles to work together.

Therefore, working your body in a way that balances muscle groups decreases the likelihood of overtraining or undertraining certain muscle groups and creating imbalances in the body. As well, working multiple muscle groups at once means higher calorie burn and faster, more efficient exercise sessions.

With modern conveniences, technology has allowed us to eliminate so many aspects of movement in our daily lives -- we go from a computer desk to the couch and we are all sitting entirely too much. Movement is critical for health.

The ViPR is a very new product and may not be available in all fitness facilities or stores yet.

Check for programs using this innovative training tool and get a trainer to show you how to use it to get the best results.

-- Postmedia Network Inc. 2013

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition November 9, 2013 D15

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

In the Key of Bart: Can’t It Be Nice This Time?

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • PHIL.HOSSACK@FREEPRESS.MB.CA 100527-Winnipeg Free Press THe Provencher Foot Bridge is lit up
  • Geese fly in the morning light over Selkirk Ave Wednesday morning- Day 22– June 13, 2012   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

What are you most looking forward to this Easter weekend?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google