Health Day - ONLINE EDITION

Sickle Cell Anemia on Rise in Newborns Worldwide

More than 400,000 cases annually expected by 2050, study shows

  • Print

TUESDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- Sickle cell anemia is increasing worldwide, and more than 400,000 babies will be born with the hereditary blood disorder in 2050, according to a new study.

In sickle cell anemia, red blood cells shaped like sickles, or crescent moons, can get stuck in small blood vessels around the body, blocking the flow of blood and oxygen.

The number of newborns with the disease is likely to increase from about 305,800 in 2010 to about 404,200 in 2050, researchers determined, using estimated country rates of sickle cell anemia and information on projected birth rates.

Newborns in India, Nigeria and the Democratic Republic of the Congo accounted for 57 percent of all babies worldwide born with sickle cell anemia in 2010 and this proportion will likely increase by 2050.

Universal screening programs could save the lives of nearly 10 million newborns with sickle cell anemia worldwide, including 85 percent of those expected to be born in sub-Saharan Africa, according to the authors of the study in the current issue of the journal PLoS Medicine.

Implementing basic health services for sickle cell anemia -- such as newborn screening and vaccination -- by 2015 could increase survival of more than 5 million newborns with the disease by 2050, according to a journal news release.

In the United States, sickle cell anemia affects 70,000 to 100,000 people, mostly African-Americans, according to the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

The new study "confirms that the global burden of [sickle cell anemia] is increasing, and highlights the need to develop specific national policies for appropriate public health planning, particularly in low- and middle-income countries," wrote Frederic Piel and colleagues from the University of Oxford and Imperial College in England, and the KEMRI/Wellcome Trust Research Program in Kenya.

The findings "underscore the need for both collaborative responses and better data for planning and monitoring," David Osrin and Edward Fottrell, of the UCL Institute of Child Health in London, wrote in an accompanying editorial.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about sickle cell anemia.

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

RMTC preview of Good People

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • JOE BRYKSA/WINNIPEG FREE PRESS Local-(Standup photo)- A wood duck swims through the water with fall refections in Kildonan Park Thursday afternoon.
  • A monarch butterfly looks for nectar in Mexican sunflowers at Winnipeg's Assiniboine Park Monday afternoon-Monarch butterflys start their annual migration usually in late August with the first sign of frost- Standup photo– August 22, 2011   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Do you agree with the province’s crackdown on flavoured tobacco products?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google