Health Day - ONLINE EDITION

When Winter Fun Isn't So Fun

Sledding, skating, skiing and other cold weather activities all carry a potential risk of harm

  • Print

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Winter sports and snowy day activities provide lots of exercise and fun, but there's also the risk of injury, an expert warns.

"More than 700,000 injuries are reported each year in the United States due to sledding. More than 30 percent are head injuries, caused by collisions," Dr. Daryl O'Connor, an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in sports medicine at Gottlieb Memorial Hospital, part of the Loyola University Health System, said in a Loyola news release.

He also warned of the potential risks of a number of other sports.

"Lacerations, as well as neck, shoulder and knee injuries are common in hockey. Many injuries are caused through contact with another player, the ice, a puck or [an] actual skate blade," O'Connor said.

As for ice skating, he said that injuries "to the wrist as well as head and neck are most common, and most injuries are caused by falls."

Among snowboarders, wrist and elbow injuries are caused by falling on outstretched hands. And, he warned, skiers knees "really take a pounding and injury is often caused by extreme twisting force propelled by the skis."

O'Connor implored kids and teens to avoid "skitching," which is when someone grabs a car's rear bumper and slides on their feet, or is pulled by ropes on inner tubes or sleds through icy streets.

"This is not even a sport; it's just being foolish," O'Connor said. "In addition to broken bones, neck and shoulder injuries, young people can suffer fatal head trauma. Please, resist the skitch at all costs."

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics offers winter safety tips.

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

City Beautiful trailer: How architecture shaped Winnipeg's DNA

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • A goose comes in for a landing Thursday morning through heavy fog on near Hyw 59 just north of Winnipeg - Day 17 Of Joe Bryksa’s 30 day goose challenge - May 24, 2012   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)
  • Two baby tigers were unveiled at the Assiniboine Park Zoo this morning, October 3rd, 2011. (TREVOR HAGAN/WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Will you get out and vote for a new mayor and council?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google