Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Keep dog safe, happy on Halloween

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Halloween may be fun and games to most people, but it can be a very frightening time for your four-legged friends. From strange-looking costumes to toxic candy, the holiday can pose many threats to your dog. The American Kennel Club has the following tips to help you and your dog have a happy and safe Halloween:

Stick to dog treats. Chocolate and candy can be dangerous for your dog. The canine digestive system is not adapted for sweets, and chocolate contains Theobromine, which can be harmful and sometimes fatal. Keep your candy bowls and trick-or-treat bags out of your dog's reach.

Walk your dog while it's still light outside on Halloween. Your dog may find candy, wrappers and broken eggs on lawns and streets. Make sure these things stay out of reach, as they can be harmful to your dog.

Children in costumes can frighten dogs. Keep your dog in a safe and secure room when you answer the door for trick-or-treaters to prevent him from running out, getting hurt or scaring your visitors.

Keep the leash handy. If you want your dog to greet trick-or-treaters with you, keep him on leash for his safety. He may be stressed by the noise, activity or simply the interruption of his normal routine.

Don't leave your dog unattended. Even if your dog is behind a fence outside on Halloween, do not leave him alone. Pranksters may target your dog with eggs, and passers-by may be tempted to give him harmful treats and candy.

Be careful about where you place candles and jack-o'-lanterns. They can be knocked over by your dog's wagging tail and either burn him or start a fire.

-- McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition October 30, 2012 D5

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