Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

My Stuff: Maureen Scurfield

Advice columnist Miss Lonelyhearts

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1. If your house were on fire, heaven forbid, what's the one item contained within that you would try to take with you? (People, pets and computers not included.)

My photographs of kids, family, friends and old boyfriends, kept right by the bed so I can grab them and run!

2. What's the one clothing/fashion item you can't live without?

Feathers! My black feather hat for going to cocktail parties and my big fat turkey feather pink boa for Miss Lonelyhearts gigs.

3. What's your favourite knick-knack and why?

Three people I loved have died. I have a tiny doll holding a flower pot for my mom Cynthia (Beamish) and an artist's duck from my dad, Bill, and photos of my brother John. If necessary, I talk to them. I know it's silly, but they are focus points. My mom was easygoing, vivacious and fun. Especially when she was younger, she was always willing to go out and do things. My dad and I used to go duck hunting together and eat Chocolate Puff cookies in the marsh. I got to carry the dead ducks to the car by their rubbery feet. I miss my brother a lot, as we were raised like twins.

4. What's the oldest thing you own?

Although I love old buildings, I don't collect old things.

5. Describe your most beloved piece of furniture.

The comfy, queen-sized bed with the reading light. I love mysteries from the Whodunit? store. When I was a kid, I used to read under the covers with a flashlight. It's still a treat, especially on a snowy weekend, to jump in part way through the day and read.

6. Is there an edible item we'll always find in your pantry or fridge?

Is my doctor reading this? Shhhhh! I have to watch my blood sugar, but I have a big stash of "no sugar added" diet chocolate goodies hidden in there behind the bags of ice.

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition January 19, 2013 E2

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