Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Honda safety tech warns drivers of pedestrian presence

  • Print

HONDA Motor Co. has unveiled experimental safety technology designed to prevent its vehicles from colliding with other vehicles, pedestrians and motorcycles.

Embedded computer chips on vehicles, in motorcycles and in a pedestrian's cellphone can communicate their respective whereabouts and detect if they are on a collision course. If so, warnings will show up on the vehicle's screen or the phone.

If that doesn't work, the vehicle is programmed to make an emergency stop.

Honda researchers last week demonstrated a range of projects in prototype stage at their research and development center in Raymond, Ohio.

The advanced technologies are part of a larger initiative to enable cars to avoid accidents autonomously even if a driver does not take evasive actions.

There were 32,000 traffic fatalities in the U.S. in 2011, noted Chuck Thomas, chief safety engineer for Honda R&D Americas.

The vehicle-to-pedestrian system works through a screen in the car that picks up a signal from the phone of a person approaching the intersection.

The chip in the car talks to the software in the phone to identify where the pedestrian is, his direction and speed and whether he is listening to music or is otherwise distracted.

The car's screen flashes a picture of the pedestrian, and if the person keeps moving, the screen warns the driver to brake.

If the driver does not react, the car will apply the brakes.

Similarly, the vehicle-to-motorcycle system presents a picture on the car's screen of an approaching motorcycle and if a collision appears imminent, warns the driver to brake and initiates a hard stop if required.

The technology could be in production by the end of the decade, said Jim Keller, Honda chief engineer for advanced technology research. "Our goal is not just to reduce the severity of accidents, but avoid them altogether," added Art St. Cyr, vice-president of product planning for American Honda.

Eight Honda vehicles are participating in the connected-vehicle safety pilot program launched in Ann Arbor, Mich., a year ago by the U.S. Department of Transportation.

The program, which has been extended by six months, is generating data to help the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration regulate connected-vehicle technology in the future.

"Advanced safety is fundamental to what it means to be a Honda," said Rick Schostek, a senior vice-president with Honda North America.

Other initiatives include preventing fatal crashes caused by distracted driving. Of those, only 38 per cent are attributed to calls and texting, said Steven Feit, chief engineer for infotainment technology.

The bulk are daydreaming and other reasons for inattentiveness.

-- Detroit Free Press

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition September 20, 2013 A1

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Raw: Video shows destroyed West Hawk Inn

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • horse in sunset - marc gallant
  • JOE.BRYKSA@FREEPRESS.MB.CA Local-(Standup photo)- Humming Around- A female ruby -throated hummingbird fly's through the bee bomb  flowers Friday at the Assiniboine Park English Garden- Nectar from flowers are their main source of food. Hummingbirds wings can beat as fast as 75x times second. Better get a glimpse of them soon the birds fly far south for the winter - from Mexico to South America- JOE BRYKSA/WINNIPEG FREE PRESS- Sept 10, 2009

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

What do you think of the new school-zone speed limit?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google