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CMHR, Manitoba Museum to partner on exhibits, programs

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The Canadian Museum for Human Rights.

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The Canadian Museum for Human Rights. Photo Store

The Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) and the Manitoba Museum (TMM) today signed an important agreement to collaborate in areas such as marketing, educational programs, collections, exhibits and knowledge --- that includes borrowing key artifacts from The 1919 Winnipeg General Strike.

"Together, our museums will create a visitor experience like no other in the world," CMHR president and CEO Stuart Murray said at a news event held today in TMM's Urban Gallery. "Our unique approaches will strengthen each other for the benefit of this community, promoting both global human rights and Manitoba's rich cultural heritage."

The two museums will share artifacts and expertise, develop programs and exhibits together, and work on cross-promotional tourism marketing. The human rights museum said it is seeking similar agreements with Winnipeg's other major cultural institutions.

"We now have an amazing opportunity to build on a 'critical mass' of museological excellence -- located mere blocks from each other," TMM CEO Claudette Leclerc said. "Not only is Winnipeg destined to become a national hub for human rights education, it can also become the city of Museum excellence with even more Canadians and tourists being exposed to our world-class interpretation, dioramas and educational programming."

Winnipeg General Strike artifacts include a Special Police armband, a Special Constable badge, a billy club, a photo plate depicting imprisoned Strike leaders, and a "One Big Union" lapel pin.

CMHR curatorial advisor Sharon Reilly spent 30 years as a TMM curator, where she developed its labour history collection, curated temporary exhibits on the Strike and helped produce an educational kit on the Strike for Manitoba students. TMM's Urban Gallery was designed to interpret Winnipeg in the fall of 1920, in the aftermath of the Strike, portraying the socio-economic conditions underlying the confrontation.

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