Winnipeg Free Press - ONLINE EDITION

Manitoba researchers solve blood disorder mystery

  • Print

A group of Manitoba medical researchers has solved a medical mystery that is expected to aid in the treatment of patients with a relatively rare blood disorder around the world.

The team of CancerCare Manitoba and the U of M scientists has identified the genetic mutation responsible for hereditary xerocytosis, a disorder that causes the rapid destruction of red blood cells. The syndrome has baffled researchers for 40 years.

The local research team’s findings have just been published in a cover story in the publication Blood, the world’s top medical journal on blood disorders.

Hereditary xerocytosis was first identified in Manitoba 40 years ago. The cause of the illness was unknown until a team led by CancerCare’s Dr. Ryan Zarychanski began an investigation two years ago.

First, the researchers sampled blood and recorded medical histories of 130 family members of the first Manitoba patient identified with the disorder. Four generations of the same family, which CancerCare is not identifying, gathered for a family reunion in a community centre to help the researchers with their task.

"From there, in collaboration with the University of Manitoba, and with support from Yale University in the United States, we used a series of sophisticated DNA techniques and were able to pinpoint the exact genetic mutation responsible for the disorder," Zarychanski said.

He said the discovery will help researchers treat similar blood disorders around the world.

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Museum will create a conversation: Stuart Murray

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • A Canada goose protects her nest full of eggs Monday on campus at the University of Manitoba- Standup photo- Apr 30, 2012   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)
  • Geese fly in the morning light over Selkirk Ave Wednesday morning- Day 22– June 13, 2012   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Do you think volunteers dragging the Red River is a good idea?

View Results

Ads by Google