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Paramedics attend to passengers at airport

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Paramedics guide passengers from a flight arriving from Mexico to an emergency vehicle at Richardson International Airport Monday.

PHIL HOSSACK / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS Enlarge Image

Paramedics guide passengers from a flight arriving from Mexico to an emergency vehicle at Richardson International Airport Monday. Photo Store

Six people were met by medical personnel at Winnipeg's James Armstrong Richardson International Airport immediately upon arrival from Cancun, Mexico on Monday afternoon.

WestJet spokesman Robert Palmer said three members of the same family were treated for vomiting and diarrhea. Palmer said it was an isolated incident. Health Canada was contacted and cleared the family back into the country.

Three women, including one on a stretcher, along with a man and two children in wheelchairs were taken from the plane and loaded into the MIRV (major incident response vehicle).

The people were passengers on WestJet flight WS2437, which landed at the airport at 4:35 p.m.

Winnipeg Airports Authority spokeswoman Felicia Wiltshire said the response of medical personnel was standard procedure.

"Three people had presented on the flight with medical issues," Wiltshire said. "Whenever anyone is coming into the airport with medical issues, we automatically contact paramedics and they make sure there is medical people on the scene to meet the plane and deal with the passengers."

Wiltshire said she believed the MIRV was brought in because multiple people required attention.

History

Updated on Monday, April 14, 2014 at 7:43 PM CDT: WestJet responds

8:50 PM: updates with medical treatment of patients

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