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Police half marathon runs Sunday

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The start of last year's annual Winnipeg Police Half Marathon at Assiniboine Park.

MIKE DEAL / FREE PRESS ARCHIVES Enlarge Image

The start of last year's annual Winnipeg Police Half Marathon at Assiniboine Park.

You can run with the law on Sunday.

About 2,700 runners are expected to race in the Winnipeg Police Service ninth annual half marathon and two-person relay in support of Cops For Cancer (Winnipeg Iron Cops) program.

The event will start at 8 a.m. just east of the Assiniboine Park footbridge after a moment of silence to remember the tragic events at the Boston Marathon last month. The second wave of runners will start at 8:30 a.m.

Iron Cops is part of the Cops For Cancer program that has raised funds for the Canadian Cancer Society since 1994. The Winnipeg Iron Cops chapter has rraised about $860,000 since 2000, including about $690,000 since the inception of the WPS Half Marathon.

The Winnipeg Police Service’s helicopter AIR1 will be on site at the Assiniboine Park for public viewing, weather permitting.

Members of the public are invited to a pancake breakfast at the race site by donating to the Canadian Cancer Society and to cheer runners along the route or finish line.

Traffic notes include:

  • Westbound Wellington Cres., from Oxford St. to the Assiniboine Park, will be closed from 6 a.m.-11 a.m. with no parking on the closed portion of Wellington Cres.
  • Park Blvd. north between Corydon Ave. and Wellington Cres. will be closed from 6 a.m. to 11 a.m.
  • Westbound Roblin Blvd from Charleswood Pkwy to Oakdale Dr. will be closed from 6 a.m.-noon.
  • No parking in the eastbound lane on the south side of Portage Ave. from Woodhaven Blvd west to Douglas Park Road from 2 a.m.-2 p.m. on race day.

Visit the WPS Half Marathon website to view the race route at www.wpshalfmarathon.ca, Event Details tab; Course Description tab.

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