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Apple co-founder Steve Jobs' childhood home in California gets historic designation

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LOS ALTOS, Calif. - The Silicon Valley home where Apple Inc. co-founder Steve Jobs grew up and built some of his first computers is now on the city's list of historic properties.

The historical commission in the city of Los Altos voted unanimously for the historic designation Monday night, the Palo Alto Daily News reported (http://bit.ly/17qaBLP ). Any proposed renovations to the modest, ranch-style home now require additional review.

The home, where Jobs and his foster parents moved in 1968, is owned by Jobs' sister, Patricia Jobs. The commission didn't need her permission for the designation, although she could appeal it to the City Council.

Zachary Dahl, a senior planner with the city, said Patricia Jobs requested corrections to the city's evaluation of the property but then didn't respond when it was sent to her for review.

"So I'm assuming that was an affirmative because I have had multiple communications with her over the past several weeks," Dahl said.

Steve Jobs, with help from his sister and Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak, built the first 100 Apple I computers at the home, according to the city's evaluation. Fifty were sold to a shop in neighbouring Mountain View for $500 each.

Steve Jobs also wooed some of Apple's first investors and in 1976, established the first partnership for Apple at the home. The company later relocated to nearby Cupertino.

"I think it's a good thing for the Silicon Valley," Dag Spicer, senior curator with the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, said about the historic designation. "People need things to reflect on and to hold on to, to have a sense of belonging."

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