September 1, 2015


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Awareness drive sought on exotic pets

Top vet urges province to address safety, proper care, guidelines for bylaws

Animals specifically prohibited in Winnipeg by Bylaw 90/2013: The Responsible Pet Ownership Bylaw.

1. All dogs, other than domesticated dogs (Canis familiaris), including, but not limited to, wolf, fox, coyote, hyaena, dingo, jackal (pictured), raccoon dog, bush dog, and any hybrid offspring of a wild dog and domesticate dog.
 (KAREL PRINSLOO / THe ASsociated Press)
2. All cats other than domesticated cats (Felis catus), including, but not limited to, lion, tiger, leopard, ocelot, jaguar, puma, panther, mountain lion (pictured), cheetah, wild cat, cougar, bobcat, lynx, serval, and any hybrid offspring of a wild cat and domesticated cat.
 (California Dept of Fish and Game / The Associated press)
3. All bears, including polar, grizzly (pictured), brown and black bear. (DARRYL DYCK / The Canadian Press)
4. All fur bearing animals of the family Mustelidae, including, but not limited to, weasel, marten, mink, badger (pictured), ermine, skunk, otter, pole cat, wolverine, except the domestic ferret (Putorius furo).
 (Associated Press)
5. All Procyonidae, including raccoon, kinkajou, cacomistle, cat-bear, panda and coatimundi.
 (SCOTT HEPPELL / The Associated press)
6. All carnivorous mammals of the family Viverridae, including, but not limited to, civet (pictured), mongoose, and genet.
 (BULLIT MARQUEZ / Associated Press)
7. All bats (Chiroptera). (Larry Kolvoord / The Associated Press)
8. All non-human primates, including, but not limited to, monkey, ape, chimpanzee, gorilla (pictured) and lemur.
 (Bita Honarvar / MCT)
9. All squirrels (Sciuridae). (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)
10 Reptiles (Reptilia)
(a) all Helodermatidae (e.g. gila monster - pictured - and Mexican bearded lizard).
10. (b) all front-fanged venomous snakes, even if devenomized, including, but not limited to:
i. all Viperidae (e.g. viper, pit viper) (pictured: Gaboon viper),
ii. all Elapidae (e.g. cobra, mamba, krait, coral snake),
iii. all Atractaspididae (e.g. African burrowing asp),
iv. all Hydrophiidae (e.g. sea snake), and
v. all Laticaudidae (e.g. sea krait).
 (CP)
10. (c) all venomous, mid- or rear-fanged, Duvernoy-glanded members of the family Colubridae, even if devenomized.
10. (d) any member or hybrid offspring of the family Boidae, including, but not limited to, the common or green anaconda (pictured) and yellow anaconda, except members of the family Boidae reaching an adult length of no greater than two (2) meters. (CP)
(e) any member of the family Pythonidae, including, but not limited to, the African rock python, the Indian or Burmese python (pictured), the Amethystine or scrub python, except members of the family Pythonidae reaching an adult length of no greater than two (2) meters. (Dave Ryan / The Associated Press)
10. (f) any member of the family Varanidae, including, but not limited to, the white throated monitor, the water monitor, the Komodo monitor or dragon (pictured), the Bornean earless monitor, the Nile monitor, the crocodile monitor, except members of the family Varanidae reaching an adult length of no greater than one (1) meter. (Dita Alangkara / The Associated Press)
10. (g) any member of the family Iguanidae, including the green or common iguana. (CP)
10. (h) any member of the family Teiidae, including, but not limited to, the golden, common or black and white tegu (pictured). (CP)
10. (i) all members of the family Chelydridae, including snapping turtle and alligator snapping turtle.
 ( Bruce Bumstead / Brandon Sun)
10. (j) all members of the order Crocodylia, including, but not limited to, alligator, caiman and crocodile. (Tribune Media MCT)
10. (k) all other snakes of a species or subspecies that can reach an adult length greater than three meters, whether the particular snake exceeds that length or not. (CP)
(l) all other lizards of a species or subspecies that can reach an adult greater than two meters, whether the particular lizard exceeds that length or not. (Eric Kayne / The Associated Press)
11 Birds (Aves) in the following categories unless they are kept as commercial animals under Part 4 of the By-law:
(a) all predatory or large birds (e.g. Accipitrids, Cathartids), including, but not limited to, eagle, hawk, falcon, owl, vulture (pictured) and condor.
 (CP)
11. (b) anseriformes, including, but not limited to, ducks, geese and swans; (Joe Bryksa / Winnipeg Free Press)
11. (c) galliformes, including, but not limited to, pheasants, grouse, guinea fowl and turkeys (pictured). (Justin Sullivan / Getty Images)
11 (d) struthioniformes, including, but not limited to, flightless ratites such as ostriches (pictured), rheas, cassowaries, emus and kiwis.
 (Chitose Suzuki / The Associated Press)
12 Arachnida and Chilopoda
(a) all venomous spiders, including, but not limited to, tarantula, black widow (pictured) and solifugid, scorpion, except the following species of tarantula: Chilean Rose (Grammostola rosea), Mexican Red-Knee (Brachypelma smithi) and Pink-Toed (Avicularia) (JASON KRYK / THE WINDSOR STAR)
12. (b) all venomous arthropods, including, but not limited to, centipede. (Eric Guinther)
13. All large rodents (Rodentia), including, but not limited to, gopher, muskrat, paca, groundhog, marmot, beaver (pictured), prairie dog, viscacha, and porcupine. (Al Hartmann / The Associated Press)
14. All even-toed ungulates (Artiodactyla) other than domestic sheep, including, but not limited to, antelope, giraffe (pictured) and hippopotamus.
 (CP)
15. All odd-toed ungulates (Perissodactyla) other than domesticated horses (Equus caballus), including, but not limited to, zebra,  rhinoceros (pictured) and tapir.
 (Associated Press)
16. All marsupials, including, but not limited to, Tasmanian devil, bandicoot, kangaroo (pictured), wallaby, opossum, wombat, koala bear, cuscus, numbat and pigmy, and greater glider, except the sugar glider.
 (Mark Duncan / The Associated Press)
17. Sea mammals (Cetacea, Pinnipedia and Sirenia), including, but not limited to, dolphin, whale, seal, sea lion and walrus (pictured). (Julie Larsen Maher / Wildlife Conservation Society / The ASsociated Press)
18 All elephants (Proboscides). (South African Tourism / MCT)
19. All hyrax (Hyracoidea). (Gordon E. Robertson)
20. All pangolin (Pholidota). (Apichart Weerawong / The ASsociated Press)
21. All sloth (pictured), anteater, and armadillo (Xenarthrata). (Wong Maye-E / The ASsociated Press)
22. Insectivorous mammals, including, but not limited to, aardvark (pictured), tenrec, shrew species, mole species and hedgehog species, except the African pygmy hedgehog. (CP)
23 Gliding lemur (Dermoptera). (Handout)
24. All other venomous or poisonous animals.

Pictured: The box jellyfish, with tentacles that can reach 3 meters long, has a sting that is so excruciating that many victims go into shock and drown and those who make it out of the water often die from the venom, which quickly attacks the heart and nervous system.  (Kelvin Aitken / marinethemes.com / The Associated Press)
25. All protected or endangered animals, whether native or non-native, whose possession or sale is prohibited in Manitoba because they are designated as protected or endangered pursuant to an international, federal, or provincial law, regulation, rule or  agreement. 

Pictured: Northern Prairie Skink, Manitoba's only lizard, which is listed as endangered by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada.
Animals specifically prohibited in Winnipeg by Bylaw 90/2013: The Responsible Pet Ownership Bylaw. 1. All dogs, other than domesticated dogs (Canis familiaris), including, but not limited to, wolf, fox, coyote, hyaena, dingo, jackal (pictured), raccoon dog, bush dog, and any hybrid offspring of a wild dog and domesticate dog. - (KAREL PRINSLOO / THe ASsociated Press)
2. All cats other than domesticated cats (Felis catus), including, but not limited to, lion, tiger, leopard, ocelot, jaguar, puma, panther, mountain lion (pictured), cheetah, wild cat, cougar, bobcat, lynx, serval, and any hybrid offspring of a wild cat and domesticated cat. - (California Dept of Fish and Game / The Associated press)
3. All bears, including polar, grizzly (pictured), brown and black bear. - (DARRYL DYCK / The Canadian Press)
4. All fur bearing animals of the family Mustelidae, including, but not limited to, weasel, marten, mink, badger (pictured), ermine, skunk, otter, pole cat, wolverine, except the domestic ferret (Putorius furo). - (Associated Press)
5. All Procyonidae, including raccoon, kinkajou, cacomistle, cat-bear, panda and coatimundi. - (SCOTT HEPPELL / The Associated press)
6. All carnivorous mammals of the family Viverridae, including, but not limited to, civet (pictured), mongoose, and genet. - (BULLIT MARQUEZ / Associated Press)
7. All bats (Chiroptera). - (Larry Kolvoord / The Associated Press)
8. All non-human primates, including, but not limited to, monkey, ape, chimpanzee, gorilla (pictured) and lemur. - (Bita Honarvar / MCT)
9. All squirrels (Sciuridae). - (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)
10 Reptiles (Reptilia) (a) all Helodermatidae (e.g. gila monster - pictured - and Mexican bearded lizard).
10. (b) all front-fanged venomous snakes, even if devenomized, including, but not limited to: i. all Viperidae (e.g. viper, pit viper) (pictured: Gaboon viper), ii. all Elapidae (e.g. cobra, mamba, krait, coral snake), iii. all Atractaspididae (e.g. African burrowing asp), iv. all Hydrophiidae (e.g. sea snake), and v. all Laticaudidae (e.g. sea krait). - (CP)
10. (c) all venomous, mid- or rear-fanged, Duvernoy-glanded members of the family Colubridae, even if devenomized.
10. (d) any member or hybrid offspring of the family Boidae, including, but not limited to, the common or green anaconda (pictured) and yellow anaconda, except members of the family Boidae reaching an adult length of no greater than two (2) meters. - (CP)
(e) any member of the family Pythonidae, including, but not limited to, the African rock python, the Indian or Burmese python (pictured), the Amethystine or scrub python, except members of the family Pythonidae reaching an adult length of no greater than two (2) meters. - (Dave Ryan / The Associated Press)
10. (f) any member of the family Varanidae, including, but not limited to, the white throated monitor, the water monitor, the Komodo monitor or dragon (pictured), the Bornean earless monitor, the Nile monitor, the crocodile monitor, except members of the family Varanidae reaching an adult length of no greater than one (1) meter. - (Dita Alangkara / The Associated Press)
10. (g) any member of the family Iguanidae, including the green or common iguana. - (CP)
10. (h) any member of the family Teiidae, including, but not limited to, the golden, common or black and white tegu (pictured). - (CP)
10. (i) all members of the family Chelydridae, including snapping turtle and alligator snapping turtle. - ( Bruce Bumstead / Brandon Sun)
10. (j) all members of the order Crocodylia, including, but not limited to, alligator, caiman and crocodile. - (Tribune Media MCT)
10. (k) all other snakes of a species or subspecies that can reach an adult length greater than three meters, whether the particular snake exceeds that length or not. - (CP)
(l) all other lizards of a species or subspecies that can reach an adult greater than two meters, whether the particular lizard exceeds that length or not. - (Eric Kayne / The Associated Press)
11 Birds (Aves) in the following categories unless they are kept as commercial animals under Part 4 of the By-law: (a) all predatory or large birds (e.g. Accipitrids, Cathartids), including, but not limited to, eagle, hawk, falcon, owl, vulture (pictured) and condor. - (CP)
11. (b) anseriformes, including, but not limited to, ducks, geese and swans; - (Joe Bryksa / Winnipeg Free Press)
11. (c) galliformes, including, but not limited to, pheasants, grouse, guinea fowl and turkeys (pictured). - (Justin Sullivan / Getty Images)
11 (d) struthioniformes, including, but not limited to, flightless ratites such as ostriches (pictured), rheas, cassowaries, emus and kiwis. - (Chitose Suzuki / The Associated Press)
12 Arachnida and Chilopoda (a) all venomous spiders, including, but not limited to, tarantula, black widow (pictured) and solifugid, scorpion, except the following species of tarantula: Chilean Rose (Grammostola rosea), Mexican Red-Knee (Brachypelma smithi) and Pink-Toed (Avicularia) - (JASON KRYK / THE WINDSOR STAR)
12. (b) all venomous arthropods, including, but not limited to, centipede. - (Eric Guinther)
13. All large rodents (Rodentia), including, but not limited to, gopher, muskrat, paca, groundhog, marmot, beaver (pictured), prairie dog, viscacha, and porcupine. - (Al Hartmann / The Associated Press)
14. All even-toed ungulates (Artiodactyla) other than domestic sheep, including, but not limited to, antelope, giraffe (pictured) and hippopotamus. - (CP)
15. All odd-toed ungulates (Perissodactyla) other than domesticated horses (Equus caballus), including, but not limited to, zebra, rhinoceros (pictured) and tapir. - (Associated Press)
16. All marsupials, including, but not limited to, Tasmanian devil, bandicoot, kangaroo (pictured), wallaby, opossum, wombat, koala bear, cuscus, numbat and pigmy, and greater glider, except the sugar glider. - (Mark Duncan / The Associated Press)
17. Sea mammals (Cetacea, Pinnipedia and Sirenia), including, but not limited to, dolphin, whale, seal, sea lion and walrus (pictured). - (Julie Larsen Maher / Wildlife Conservation Society / The ASsociated Press)
18 All elephants (Proboscides). - (South African Tourism / MCT)
19. All hyrax (Hyracoidea). - (Gordon E. Robertson)
20. All pangolin (Pholidota). - (Apichart Weerawong / The ASsociated Press)
21. All sloth (pictured), anteater, and armadillo (Xenarthrata). - (Wong Maye-E / The ASsociated Press)
22. Insectivorous mammals, including, but not limited to, aardvark (pictured), tenrec, shrew species, mole species and hedgehog species, except the African pygmy hedgehog. - (CP)
23 Gliding lemur (Dermoptera). - (Handout)
24. All other venomous or poisonous animals. Pictured: The box jellyfish, with tentacles that can reach 3 meters long, has a sting that is so excruciating that many victims go into shock and drown and those who make it out of the water often die from the venom, which quickly attacks the heart and nervous system. - (Kelvin Aitken / marinethemes.com / The Associated Press)
25. All protected or endangered animals, whether native or non-native, whose possession or sale is prohibited in Manitoba because they are designated as protected or endangered pursuant to an international, federal, or provincial law, regulation, rule or agreement. Pictured: Northern Prairie Skink, Manitoba's only lizard, which is listed as endangered by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada.

The global trade in exotic pets is a multi-billion business and sales in Manitoba are on the rise, states a provincial report commissioned in the aftermath of the tragedy in New Brunswick last month that saw two small boys killed by an African rock python.

And although some exotic animals can pose risks to human safety and health, the government has, until now, lacked a co-ordinated approach to dealing with them. Instead, a patchwork of provincial laws, spanning several departments, govern the creatures, the report says.

Lance Rosolowich, co-owner of Pet Traders, displays a blue-tongued skink in his store Monday. This skink is legal in the province. 'It's very popular because you can feed them cat food and vegetables,' said Rosolowich.

JOHN WOODS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Lance Rosolowich, co-owner of Pet Traders, displays a blue-tongued skink in his store Monday. This skink is legal in the province. 'It's very popular because you can feed them cat food and vegetables,' said Rosolowich. Photo Store

"Industry representatives estimate the trade value in reptiles alone to be approximately $250,000 annually within the province. This is expected to double in the next two to five years, based on current trends," chief provincial veterinarian Wayne Lees said in his report.

'Industry representatives estimate the trade value in reptiles alone to be approximately $250,000 annually within the province'

The report also said there are likely "tens of thousands" of reptiles kept or bred as pets in Manitoba.

The 19-page document, a copy of which was obtained by the Free Press, recommends the province launch a targeted public awareness campaign to inform owners on the safe handling and proper care of exotic pets. It also suggests the government work with the Association of Manitoba Municipalities to develop a template or guidelines for the creation of local bylaws on exotic-pet ownership and possession. (The City of Winnipeg, which recently updated its rules governing the ownership of wild and domesticated animals, has one of the most comprehensive bylaws in the country.)

Down the road, the report says, the province could create an interdepartmental strategy on exotic pets and, if need be, pass legislation to further regulate and license pet stores, breeders and owners of exotic animals.

But Lees said in an interview Monday public education and the creation of sound local bylaws should be given a chance to work first before the province introduces a new set of laws and regulations.

And Premier Greg Selinger agreed Monday, calling that "a sensible approach." He said creation of a provincial set of rules and regulations would only be done as a last resort.

"I think what the report has done is given us a path forward that is practical and cost-effective and can protect the public, which was the whole point of this exercise," he said.

In his report, Lees said the majority of exotic pets are sold either online through websites such as Kijiji or in pet stores. While most exotic pets sold here used to be imported, the majority are now bred within Canada, the report said.

Apart from the possibility some exotic animals may injure or kill someone, there is also the risk certain animals can pass on diseases to humans. The report said about 75 per cent of new or emerging diseases are zoonotic in origin, meaning they pass from animals to humans.

Lance Rosolowich, co-owner of Pet Traders on Portage Avenue, said sales of reptiles are down compared with what they were a few years ago, but they played a crucial role at a critical time for his industry.

"The reptile industry itself basically saved the pet business during the recession because it was peaking at that time," he said. Most reptiles sold by stores are quite small, such as corn snakes, which are the size of garter snakes.

Rosolowich and other pet store owners interviewed said there is also a considerable underground trade in exotic animals, much of it carried out online.

"You can buy in Manitoba anything that you want," he said, including African rock pythons. When young and small, they can be had for $100.

"A lot of these guys who sell this stuff, they don't realize the ramifications of it 10 years later," Rosolowich said.

larry.kusch@freepress.mb.ca

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition September 24, 2013 A4

History

Updated on Tuesday, September 24, 2013 at 6:40 AM CDT: Changes photo, adds slideshow

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