The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

Family of 'Cuckoo's Nest' author plans to restore bus that made 'Electric Kool-Aid Acid' trip

  • Print

GRANTS PASS, Ore. - The family of writer Ken Kesey is reviving plans to restore his original psychedelic bus in time for the 50th anniversary of its passengers' LSD-laced trip across America.

Stephanie Kesey said Friday she has created a foundation to raise money for the restoration as a tribute to her late father-in-law.

"It's the private Ken Kesey I'm saying thank you to, but in a very public way," she said from her home in Pleasant Hill, a short way from the Willamette Valley farm where Ken Kesey settled after the bus trip.

Fresh from the stunning success of his novel "One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest," Ken Kesey bought the 1939 International school bus in 1964 from a San Francisco Bay Area family who fitted it with bunks as a motor home.

With a jug of LSD-laced juice in the refrigerator, clean-cut Kesey pals known as The Merry Pranksters on board, and Neal Cassady, the driver in Jack Kerouac's "On the Road," at the wheel, the bus crossed the country from California to New York to visit the World's Fair.

The journey was made famous by the book, "The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test."

Kesey put the old bus, called "Further," into retirement in a swampy patch of woods on his farm, and years later bought a newer one, which in typical Prankster style he tried to pass off as the original.

"The bus is essentially the best icon of the '60's," said his son, Zane Kesey.

Ken Kesey died in 2001. Four years later, a Hollywood restaurateur offered to pay to restore the bus, and the family hauled it out of the swamp. But the deal fell through.

Stephanie Kesey said the project is back on track, and her family is under the gun to get it finished by next summer, the 50th anniversary of the trip across America. They are putting updates on Zane Kesey's Facebook page and building a website for the project.

"We are in the middle of finding out how much money this is going is going to cost," Stephanie Kesey said. "We get one shot at doing this. We definitely want to do it right."

The goal is to do a museum-quality restoration, preserving as much of the rusty old original as possible, and to secure a trailer for it to ride around in. They hope to produce a documentary on the work.

Zane Kesey said the family will hold a vote to decide which of the constantly evolving psychedelic paintjobs to put on the bus. They have plenty of photos and film footage to consider, and plenty of members of The Merry Pranksters to do the work.

"Part of me was willing to let it rust away out in the woods," Zane Kesey said. "It was beautiful and happy out there. But eventually it wouldn't be beautiful and happy."

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Tree remover has special connection to Grandma Elm

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • A young goose gobbles up grass at Fort Whyte Alive Monday morning- Young goslings are starting to show the markings of a adult geese-See Bryksa 30 day goose challenge- Day 20– June 11, 2012   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)
  • A one day old piglet glances up from his morning feeding at Cedar Lane Farm near Altona.    Standup photo Ruth Bonneville Winnipeg Free Press

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Which of Manitoba's new landlord-tenant rules are you looking forward to most?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google