Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Park camera gives peek into wolf-pack life

  • Print

GIVEN how tough it is to convince 11 kids to sit for a group photo, imagine trying to get 11 wolves to sit still.

A wildlife camera in Riding Mountain National Park managed to pull off this trick in January, when what appears to be an entire wolf pack -- 11 of the wild canines -- was captured within a single frame.

The black-and-white photo was triggered automatically along a trail in an undisclosed portion of the western Manitoba park, external-relations manager Roger Schroeder said.

The shot has made the social-media rounds since the park posted on Facebook.

"We're just delighted with the response," Schroeder said. "For us, it's all part of the discussion we want to have about the (ecological) role of wolf populations."

The park estimates 113 wolves reside within its boundaries, which amounts to Riding Mountain's largest wolf population since 1975. Wolf packs typically range in size from two to 10 animals, with six being the average size. Packs of 11 wolves are unusual but not unprecedented.

A 2004 study says Riding Mountain's wolves rely on elk for two-thirds of their diet. Moose make up another quarter of the wolves' meals, while beavers, white-tailed deer and hares account for the rest.

Wolves are not, however, responsible for a decline in elk numbers within the park. In response to the presence of bovine tuberculosis among the elk herd, the park has facilitated more elk hunting outside its borders.

bartley.Kives@freepress.mb.ca

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition February 5, 2013 A2

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Preview of Small Things at PTE Mainstage

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • PHIL.HOSSACK@FREEPRESS.MB.CA 090728 / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS White Pelicans belly up to the sushi bar Tuesday afternoon at Lockport. One of North America's largest birds is a common sight along the Red RIver and on Lake Winnipeg. Here the fight each other for fish near the base of Red RIver's control structure, giving human fisher's downstream a run for their money.
  • Marc Gallant/Winnipeg Free Press. Gardening Column- Assiniboine Park English Garden. July 19, 2002.

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Who will you vote for in Wednesday's mayoral race?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google