Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Winnipeg slips to No. 16 in rating of best places to live in Canada

  • Print

RISING housing prices, persistent crime and sluggish employment combined to push Winnipeg down to No. 16 on MoneySense magazine's annual list of the best places to live in Canada.

That's down from No. 10 a year ago.

Sarah Efron, deputy editor of the Toronto magazine, said it's not as if Winnipeg suffered a catastrophic event in 2012, but its performance on a number of criteria suffered relative to other cities. A total of 200 cities were examined in the survey.

For example, the city's jobless rate of five per cent is excellent in isolation but ranks No. 60 when a multitude of cities in Alberta were churning out between three and four per cent unemployment.

"Sometimes, a city is doing a lot of things right but there's a boom in another part in the country," Efron said.

Calgary topped the list for the first time in the eight years it has been compiled, followed by St. Albert, Alta., and Burlington, Ont. Winnipeg was behind London, Ont., and ahead of Regina.

Four other Manitoba communities also made the list -- Steinbach (61), Brandon (91), Portage la Prairie (160) and Thompson (164). Lachute, Que..,was last.

As surprised as some Winnipeggers might be to hear their city has fallen from the Top 10 when there are so many positive developments -- the return of the NHL, the construction of a new football stadium and the Canadian Museum for Human Rights -- the more shocking decline was Brandon, diving to No. 91 from No. 6. Efron said Manitoba's second-biggest city fell because its population growth, which had been at around 10 per cent annually, has slowed to a trickle and its jobless rate rose to five per cent from four per cent.

MoneySense looked at 33 different criteria, including income, weather, housing, crime, alternatives to driving, rainfall, population growth, household income and the number of days where the temperature is above 0 C.

Winnipeg performed well on some measures, such as No. 25 for people using transit to get to work, but not so well on others, such as 120th on crime. Still others, of course, such as the weather and the number of days where the temperature is below freezing, will never change appreciably.

geoff.kirbyson@freepress.mb.ca

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition March 21, 2013 A8

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Premier, Mayor comment on CMHR opening

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • A pelican comes in for a landing Wednesday afternoon on the Red River at Lockport, Manitoba - Standup photo- June 27, 2012   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)
  • A Yellow-bellied Sapsucker hangs out on a birch tree in St. Vital. The Yellow-bellied Sapsucker is considered a keystone species. Other species take advantage of the holes that the birds make in trees. A group of sapsuckers are collectively known as a

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Do you support Canada's involvement in the fight against Islamic State?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google