The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

Air Canada may resume flights to Venezuela if outstanding issues addressed

  • Print

MONTREAL - Air Canada says it may resume flights to Venezuela that were suspended in March if outstanding issues, including passenger revenues being held by the South American country's government, are addressed.

However, the airline on Monday denied a published report in Venezuela that said it had informed the government of its intention to resume scheduled service.

"Once we are satisfied circumstances permit and the repatriation of funds is addressed, we would certainly evaluate the re-introduction of flights with the objective of resuming operations," spokeswoman Isabelle Arthur wrote in an email.

The South American country's tourism minister, Andres Izarra, was quoted saying Air Canada (TSX:AC.B) had sent three letters expressing its interest in resuming flights.

He added that airlines will never shut down their operations to the "buoyant market."

An international association representing global airlines says US$1.4 billion of revenues are being held by the Venezuelan government in breach of international treaties.

IATA director general and CEO Tony Tyler recently said there is little chance of Venezuela's economy recovering unless air transport resumes.

"Air transport is a catalyst of economic growth and is a critical component of Venezuela’s economic well-being and a vital link to the global economy," he said in a news release.

Air Canada was one of several global carriers that suspended flights, citing on-going civil unrest that prevented it from ensuring the safety of its operations.

Prior to the suspension of flights, Air Canada operated three return flights weekly between Toronto and the Venezuelan capital.

International capacity to and from the country is down 49 per cent from peak levels last year and 36 per cent from last summer.

The Montreal-based carrier suspended flights a few days after Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro said any airline that reduced or suspended flights in and out of Venezuela would face severe measures.

Maduro had said any airline that leaves won't be allowed back while he is in power.

American Airlines said Monday it continues to work with the Venezuelan government on a resolution, but reduced its weekly flights from 48 to 10, including one daily flight from Miami to Caracas.

"We value our business and long-standing relationships with the government. However, since we are owed a substantial outstanding amount and have been unable to reach resolution on the debt, we have significantly reduced our flights to the country," said spokeswoman Martha Pantin.

___

Follow @RossMarowits on Twitter

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Exclusive architectural tour of CMHR with Antoine Predock

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • A monarch butterfly looks for nectar in Mexican sunflowers at Winnipeg's Assiniboine Park Monday afternoon-Monarch butterflys start their annual migration usually in late August with the first sign of frost- Standup photo– August 22, 2011   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)
  • A gosling stares near water at Omands Creek Park-See Bryksa 30 day goose challenge- Day 25– June 21, 2012   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Should the Canadian Museum for Human Rights use the word 'genocide' in exhibits on Indian residential schools?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google