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Defeated on soccer field? Bad news for investors

Prof finds link between defeat, market performance

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Another goal by the opponents? There goes the market.

FRANK AUGSTEIN / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILES Enlarge Image

Another goal by the opponents? There goes the market.

LONDON -- Argentina and Germany face off in the World Cup final Sunday, and investors in both countries will do well to be alert to potential drops on their stock markets the day after in case of defeat.

With markets driven by sentiment as well as fundamental factors such as growth, dividend payments and inflation, a big sporting defeat can depress the mood of traders and cause the stock market to underperform.

Alex Edmans, a professor at London Business School and the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, has assessed the effect of major sporting events on market behaviour for years, and his analysis of this World Cup has confirmed defeats have generally resulted in declines the day after that are greater than, or counter, to the performance of the wider global market.

"The efficient-markets hypothesis argues that stock prices depend only on fundamentals," said Edmans. "That would be true if traders were robots. But, traders are human beings and they're affected by emotions."

Across all countries with a developed stock market index, Edmans has found defeat in the World Cup led to the national index underperforming the main world market index, the MSCI, by 0.2 percentage points. The average losses experienced in many of the "soccer-crazy" countries -- especially England, Italy and Spain -- were met with bigger declines of some 0.6 percentage points.

That was particularly notable for defending world champion Spain after its 5-1 demolition by the Netherlands in their opening match. Spain's market fell by one per cent the following day as opposed to the 0.1 per cent gain in the world market. Italy saw its main market slide 1.5 per cent on a day when the world market index was flat, after the Azzurri lost 1-0 to Costa Rica, putting the team's qualification for the second round in doubt.

In total, Edmans found 25 of the 37 defeats he analyzed triggered market underperformance. Most recently, the Netherlands' main stock market fell one per cent faster than the world market after its defeat on penalties to Argentina in the semifinal Wednesday.

The results appear consistent with the findings of a study published in 2007 in the Journal of Finance Edmans co-authored with Diego Garcia of the University of North Carolina and Oyvind Norli from the Norwegian School of Management. It analyzed 1,100 soccer games from 1973 to 2004 and found a loss in the elimination stages of the World Cup led to the national market falling around 0.5 per cent the next day.

One notable exception in this World Cup was the performance of Brazil's stock market, which rallied the first trading day after the national team's 7-1 thrashing by Germany in the semifinal.

That defeat, said Edmans, "was so bad that investors think it significantly increases the chances that socialist President Dilma Rousseff will be ousted in October's elections and be replaced by Aecio Neves, the leader of the more pro-business PSDB party."

Rousseff has been criticized by some for agreeing to spend billions of dollars on hosting the World Cup instead of on longer-lasting investments such as schools and hospitals, at a time when Brazil's economy is stuttering.

 

-- The Associated Press

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition July 12, 2014 B6

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