A few clouds

Winnipeg, MB

11°c A few clouds

Full Forecast

Business

Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Government shutdown grounds airplane sales

Law prohibits FAA from running registry

Posted: 10/12/2013 1:00 AM | Comments: 0

Advertisement

  • Print

DALLAS -- Eni, Italy's biggest energy company, has a group of 10 Houston businesspeople waiting to buy its Dassault Aviation Falcon 2000 jet. What it doesn't have is the U.S. paperwork needed to sell the plane.

The partial government shutdown entering its 12th day today is keeping the purchasers from closing on a deal with Rome-based Eni valued at about $5 million, said Bob Nygren, a founder of aircraft broker AeroSmith Penny in Houston. Eni has stashed the twin-engine Falcon at a suburban Dallas airport.

Executive jets aren't the only ones being sidelined. Hundreds of sales from vendors as varied as Airbus SAS and individuals are stalled as the Federal Aviation Administration's aircraft-registration office remains shuttered. Titles for $2.5 billion of jetliners, small planes and helicopters may be in limbo if the shutdown runs into next week.

"This is a mess," said William King, a vice-president at Cirrus Aircraft, which installs parachutes on its planes so they float to the ground in an engine failure. "Even if they settle this out quickly in the next 10 days, we could still be in a position of not meeting our delivery numbers by Jan. 1."

The snags are part of the economic ripple effects from the first government shutdown in 17 years. Five U.S. senators urged FAA administrator Michael Huerta in a letter this week to reopen the Oklahoma City-based registry because it's "inflicting unnecessary hardship on aviation industries."

'Even if they settle this out quickly in the next 10 days, we could still be in a position of not meeting our... numbers'

None of the about 800 officials now being recalled to ensure air safety will be assigned to the registry, the FAA said. During the shutdown, U.S. law prohibits the FAA from running the registry and other operations that aren't protecting "life and property," the agency said in a statement this week.

Title work for planes of all sizes flows through the office, which is tucked within a sprawling FAA campus and usually operates "locked down like Fort Knox," said Clay Healey, owner of AIC Title Service in Oklahoma City, referring to the U.S. gold reserves stored in Kentucky.

Seated at rows of desks in a documents room, title-company workers download aircraft information unavailable outside the registry's walls, Healey said in an interview. A bank teller-type window allows users to slide in paperwork for time-stamping by an FAA official, he said.

Without the FAA's permission, $514 million of Europe-built jets from Airbus can't be shipped into the U.S. for carriers including US Airways Group Inc. and AMR's American Airlines.

"This is a very unfortunate situation," Maryanne Greczyn, a U.S. spokeswoman for Toulouse, France-based Airbus, said by email. "We are hopeful for a rapid-as-possible solution."

More than 30 companies, including Airbus, Boeing and units of General Electric and Bank of America, sent a letter Friday to Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx, requesting the registry be reopened on security concerns. The FAA, among other things, provides the Transportation Security Administration and law enforcement agencies with aircraft-related information, they said in the letter.

The companies also said they're concerned the increase in an already large backlog for new registration applications, combined with the expiration of temporary authorizations, will cause "enormous delivery delays."

At least two planes from Canada's Bombardier with a list value of about $75 million, one of them for Delta Air Lines, are also in limbo, and Brazil's Embraer said this week its U.S. regional-jet deliveries may be affected "in the coming weeks" if FAA offices stay shuttered.

Boeing has been making deliveries to U.S. customers that submitted registry paperwork before the shutdown and to international airlines that list planes with regulators in their home markets, said Doug Alder, a spokesman for the Chicago-based planemaker. U.S. carriers also can take planes using temporary registration forms, he said.

Cirrus, based in Duluth, Minn., had to put delivery on hold this week for one of its single-engine planes because of the shutdown, executive King said.

Eni is selling its used Falcon to upgrade to a G550 from General Dynamics' Gulfstream, according to Nygren, the Houston-based aircraft broker. He declined to identify his buyer group, and Eni didn't respond to telephone and emailed requests for comment about the sale.

Dassault has delayed handing over three new jets completed at its facility in Little Rock, Ark., said Andrew Ponzoni, a spokesman. If the shutdown drags on more than two weeks, the Paris-based planemaker won't have authorization to fly in planes from France to be finished in the U.S., he said, without identifying the buyers. Falcon operators include NetJets, the aviation business of Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway.

"The fourth quarter is traditionally our busiest time of year for Falcon completions and deliveries," Ponzoni said in an emailed response to questions, in which he declined to identify the planes' customers. "The longer the FAA Registry Office remains closed, the deeper the impact will be on our business."

The Washington-based General Aviation Manufacturers Association, which represents makers of small aircraft and their suppliers, estimated a shutdown dragging into next week would put $1.9 billion of light planes and helicopters on hold.

-- Bloomberg News

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition October 12, 2013 B10

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories? Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.