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Millions of accounts breached: Target

Black Friday shoppers at U.S. stores potentially exposed

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The data theft from Target stores is the second-largest credit card breach in the U.S.

DAMIAN DOVARGANES / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Enlarge Image

The data theft from Target stores is the second-largest credit card breach in the U.S.

Target is grappling with a data security nightmare that threatens to drive off holiday shoppers during the company's busiest time of year.

The big U.S. retailer said Thursday data connected to about 40 million credit and debit card accounts was stolen as part of a breach that began over the U.S. Thanksgiving weekend.

The discount retailer didn't specify where the affected stores were located except they were all in the United States and none of its Canadian stores was involved.

The data theft marks the second-largest credit card breach in the U.S. after retailer TJX Cos. announced in 2007 at least 45.7 million credit and debit card users had been exposed to credit card fraud.

An even larger hack hit Sony in 2011. It had to rebuild trust among PlayStation Network gamers after hackers compromised personal information including credit card data on more than 100 million user accounts.

Target's acknowledgement came a day after news reports the discounter was investigating a breach surfaced.

The chain said customers who made purchases by swiping their cards at terminals in its U.S. stores between Nov. 27 and Dec. 15 might have had their accounts exposed. The stolen data include customer names, credit and debit card numbers, card expiration dates and the three-digit security codes located on the backs of cards.

The data breach did not affect online purchases, the company said.

The stolen information included Target store brand cards and major card brands such as Visa and MasterCard.

On the New York Stock Exchange, Target shares closed down $1.40, off 2.2 per cent, at $62.15.

The Minneapolis company, which has 1,797 stores in the U.S. and 124 in Canada, said it immediately told authorities and financial institutions once it became aware of the breach on Dec. 15. The company is teaming with a third-party forensics firm to investigate and prevent future breaches.

The breach is the latest in a series of technology crises for Target. The company faced tough criticism in late 2011 after it drummed up hype around its offerings from Italian designer Missoni only to see its website crash. The site was down most of the day the designer's collection launched. The company angered customers further with numerous online delays for products and even order cancellations.

But the credit card breach poses an even more serious problem for Target and threatens to scare away shoppers who worry about the safety of their personal data.

"A data breach is of itself a huge reputational issue," said Jeremy Robinson-Leon, a principal at Group Gordon, a corporate and crisis public relations firm. He noted Target needs to send the message it's rectifying the problem and working with customers to answer questions. He believes Target should have acknowledged the problem on Wednesday rather than waiting until early Thursday.

"This is close to the worst time to have it happen," Robinson-Leon said. "If I am a Target customer, I think I would be much more likely to go to a competitor over the next few days, rather than risk the potential to have my information be compromised."

Target advised customers Thursday to check their statements carefully. Those who see suspicious charges on the cards should report it to their credit card companies and call Target at 866-852-8680. Cases of identity theft can also be reported to law enforcement or the U.S. Federal Trade Commission.

"Target's first priority is preserving the trust of our guests and we have moved swiftly to address this issue, so guests can shop with confidence. We regret any inconvenience this may cause," chairman, president and CEO Gregg Steinhafel said in a statement Thursday.

Many displeased Target customers left angry comments on the company's Facebook page. Some threatened to stop shopping at the store. Many customers complained they couldn't get through to the call centre and couldn't get on Target's branded credit card website.

Target apologized on its Facebook page and said it is "working hard" to resolve the issue and is adding more workers to field the calls and help solve website issues.

Christopher Browning, 23 of Chesterfield, Va., said he was the victim of credit card fraud earlier this week and he believes it was tied to a purchase he made at Target with his Visa card on Black Friday. However, he called Visa Thursday and the card issuer couldn't confirm. He said he hasn't been able to get through to Target's call centre.

On Monday, Browning received a call from his bank's anti-fraud unit saying there were two attempts to use his credit card in California -- one at a casino in Tracey, Calif., for $8,000 and the other at a casino in Pacheco, for $3,000. Both occurred on Sunday and were denied. He cancelled his credit card and plans to use cash.

"I won't shop at Target again until the people behind this theft are caught or the reasons for the breach are identified and fixed," said Browning.

The incident is particularly troublesome for Target because it has used its branded credit and debit cards as a marketing tool to lure shoppers with a five per cent discount. The company said during its earnings call in November that as of October some 20 per cent of store customers have the Target branded cards.

 

-- The Associated Press, with files from The Canadian Press

 

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition December 20, 2013 B8

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