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No whopper: BK introduces lower-cal fries

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NEW YORK -- Burger King wants people to feel less guilty about gobbling up its french fries.

The world's No. 2 hamburger launched a new crinkle-cut french fry in the U.S. on Tuesday that it says has 20 per cent fewer calories than its regular french fries.

The chain says a small order of the new "Satisfries" clocks in at 270 calories because of a new batter that doesn't absorb as much oil. By comparison, a small order of its regular fries, sans crinkles, has 350 calories.

A spokesperson for Burger King Canada said in an email a similar product under a different name will be announced on Wednesday.

The concept of taking an indulgent food and removing some of the guilt isn't new, of course. Supermarkets are filled with baked Lay's potato chips, 100-calorie packs of Oreos and other less fattening versions of popular treats. Such creations play on people's inability to give up their food vices, even as they struggle to eat better. The idea is to create something that skimps on calories, but not on taste.

Burger King executives say people won't be able to tell Satisfries are lower in calories. They use exactly the same ingredients as its regular fries -- potatoes, oil and batter. To keep kitchen operations simple, they're even made in the same fryers and cooked for the same amount of time as regular fries.

The difference, Burger King says, is it adjusts the proportions of different ingredients for the batter to block out more oil. The company declined to be more specific. Another difference, the crinkle-cut shape, is in part so workers will be able to easily distinguish them from the regular fries when they're deep frying them together.

"You need to make things as simple as possible," says Eric Hirschorn, Burger King's chief marketing officer.

Alex Macedo, head of North American operations at Burger King, said the chain worked with one of its potato suppliers, Canada's McCain Foods, to develop the lower-calorie fries.

As per capita consumption of french fries has declined over the years, frozen potato suppliers have been working on ways to reduce fat and calories in french fries, said Maureen Storey, president and CEO of the Alliance for Potato Research & Education, an industry group.

"It's actually not an easy thing to do because consumers want the same taste and the same texture," she said.

Burger King took great pains to keep the launch of Satisfries under wraps. Last week, reporters were invited to preview a "top secret new product" at a New York City hotel, where they were asked to sign non-disclosure agreements. Attendees were each served a carton of the fries on a plate that looked and tasted like any other fries, even leaving the familiar grease stains in their paper cartons.

Burger King led off its presentation by comparing the fries to the "leading french fries," which are made by rival McDonald's. On a pound-for-pound basis, executives noted the new fries have 30 per cent fewer calories than those served at the Golden Arches.

The comparison with McDonald's may prove to be confusing for some, since fast-food chains each have their own definitions of what qualifies as a small, medium or large.

A small serving at McDonald's, for example, weighs considerably less than a small order at Burger King. As a result, a small order of McDonald's fries has 230 calories -- which is still less than the 270 calories for a small serving of Burger King's Satisfries. A "value" order of Satisfries at Burger King -- which is closer in weight to the small size at McDonald's -- has 190 calories.

Burger King is betting Satisfries will be so popular people will be willing to fork over more money for them. The suggested price for a small order of Satisfries is $1.89, compared with $1.59 for regular fries. That's a 19 per cent markup.

 

-- The Associated Press

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition September 25, 2013 B5

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