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Chinese ships arrive in Vietnam to evacuate workers following deadly riots

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Vietnamese security officers set up a fence outside an area of the Chinese Embassy in Hanoi, Vietnam on Sunday, May 18, 2014. Vietnamese authorities forcibly broke up small protests against China in two cities on Sunday, after deadly anti-China rampages over a simmering territorial dispute risked damaging the economy and spooked a state used to keeping a tight grip on its people. In southern Ho Chi Minh City, police dragged away several demonstrators from a park in the city center. In Hanoi, authorities closed off streets and a park close to the Chinese Embassy and pushed journalists and protesters away. (AP Photo/Na Son Nguyen)

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Vietnamese security officers set up a fence outside an area of the Chinese Embassy in Hanoi, Vietnam on Sunday, May 18, 2014. Vietnamese authorities forcibly broke up small protests against China in two cities on Sunday, after deadly anti-China rampages over a simmering territorial dispute risked damaging the economy and spooked a state used to keeping a tight grip on its people. In southern Ho Chi Minh City, police dragged away several demonstrators from a park in the city center. In Hanoi, authorities closed off streets and a park close to the Chinese Embassy and pushed journalists and protesters away. (AP Photo/Na Son Nguyen)

HANOI, Vietnam - Two Chinese passenger ships were moored off a central Vietnamese port on Monday preparing to evacuate Chinese workers following deadly rioting last week, officials said.

The nationwide unrest, the worst to hit in Vietnam years, followed Beijing's deployment of a large oil rig in a patch of the South China Sea also claimed by Vietnam. Both nations have sent ships to the waters that are now locked in a tense standoff with each other, raising fears of possible conflict.

The boats with a capacity to carry 1,000 passengers each arrived at Vung Ang early Monday morning, said a port official who wasn't authorized to speak to the media. Thai Tran Linh, a government official in Ha Tinh, said the two boats were moored just off the port and were finalizing paperwork to dock.

Vung Ang port is part of a large Taiwanese steel mill complex 250 kilometres (155 miles) south of Hanoi that was overrun by an anti-China mob last week.

Two Chinese workers were killed and 140 injured in the incident, the most serious in nationwide unrest in which several factories and industrial parks were attacked. Many factories were not Chinese-run but Taiwanese or from elsewhere in Asia, apparently targeted mistakenly or by gangs intent on looting.

The riot Wednesday and Thursday took place at a complex operated by the conglomerate Formosa Plastics Group, Vietnam's largest single foreign invested project. Linh said the complex employed 3,000 Chinese citizens.

Vietnam's government, furious at China's positioning of the rig, initially allowed street protests, a rarity in the authoritarian country. But since the rioting they have cracked down, aware that the violence threatened the country's reputation as a safe and cheap destination for foreign manufacturers to establish.

There has been no violence or protests since last Thursday, and many Chinese have left the country independently.

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