Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Winnipeg wins over tourism heavyweights

  • Print

It doesn't have marketing slogan written all over it, but let's yell it out loud anyway, Winnipeg -- We're No. 12!

Manitoba's capital is the 12th most popular Canadian city for international visitors, according to new research from Hotels.com.

20 Most Popular Canadian Cities for International Visitors

 

City, Prov, 2014 vs. 2013 Rank Change

 

1. Toronto, ON No change

2. Vancouver, BC No change

3. Montreal, QC No change

4. Niagara Falls, ON No change

5. Calgary, AB No change

6. Quebec, Q No change

7. Ottawa, ON +1

8. Victoria, BC -1

9. Banff, AB No change

10. Whistler, BC +1

11. Edmonton, AB -1

12. Winnipeg, MB No change

13. Halifax, NS No change

14. Canmore, AB +1

15. Jasper, AB -1

16. Lake Louise, AB +2

17. Windsor, ON +1

18. London, ON -1

19. Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON +1

20. Regina, SK +3 (New)

It's the same ranking as last year, but Taylor Cole, travel expert at Hotels.com, said it's worth noting Winnipeg ranked ahead of well-known tourism destinations such as Lake Louise (16) and Halifax (13). Winnipeg may even be poised to move up the list.

"It's an interesting city to watch as there are a lot of current and up-and-coming attractions from the Assiniboine Park Zoo to the Canadian Museum for Human Rights," Cole said.

The good news, she said, is Winnipeg is easy to access via frequent flights on popular airlines, including WestJet and Air Canada, and with the airport close to downtown, it's also convenient for business travellers.

Topping the list is Toronto, followed by Vancouver, Montreal, Niagara Falls, Calgary, Quebec, Ottawa, Victoria, Banff and Whistler.

Hotels.com also determined the most popular international cities for Canadians. New York topped that list, followed by Las Vegas, London, Paris, Orlando, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle and Rome.

Hotels.com compiles its numbers from booking patterns on its website.

 

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition August 23, 2014 B9

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Humans of the Holidays

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • A female Mallard duck leads a group of duckings on a morning swim through the reflections in the Assiniboine River at The Forks Monday.     (WAYNE GLOWACKI/WINNIPEG FREE PRESS) Winnipeg Free Press  June 18 2012
  • A Yellow-bellied Sapsucker hangs out on a birch tree in St. Vital. The Yellow-bellied Sapsucker is considered a keystone species. Other species take advantage of the holes that the birds make in trees. A group of sapsuckers are collectively known as a

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

What's your take on the Jets so far this season?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google