The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

Alberta gives new birth certificate to 12-year-old boy who was born a girl

  • Print
Transgender student Wren Kauffman is shown in Edmonton, Alberta on Thursday August 29, 2013. Kauffman has been granted a new birth certificate that recognizes him as male.

JASON FRANSON / THE CANADIAN PRESS Enlarge Image

Transgender student Wren Kauffman is shown in Edmonton, Alberta on Thursday August 29, 2013. Kauffman has been granted a new birth certificate that recognizes him as male.

EDMONTON - A 12-year-old transgender Alberta boy has been granted a new birth certificate that recognizes him as male.

Wren Kauffman was presented with the new document on Sunday in Edmonton during a Pride festival brunch hosted by the city's mayor.

The province's culture minister, Heather Klimchuk, made the presentation.

A spokesperson for the minister says the new certificate simply has a "M" instead of an "F."

Kauffman had filed a complaint with the Alberta Human Rights Commission over the inability to change the sex on his birth certificate.

Alberta law states that transgender persons must have reassignment surgery before they can change the sex on their birth certificates, but Premier Dave Hancock said in April that the surgery requirement will be dropped.

Wren, who was born a girl, had said it was stressful being listed as female.

A week after Hancock made the announcement, a judge ruled that the Alberta law dealing with birth certificates violates the rights of transgender people.

In the 1970s, most provinces changed their laws so people could change their birth certificates after sex reassignment surgery. The revision left out transgender children, because people must be at least 18 to be eligible for the surgery.

Ontario revised its law following a human rights tribunal ruling in 2012 that declared it discriminatory to require an actual sex-change operation for a transgender woman who wanted to switch to female from male on her birth certificate.

It now allows a change with a note from a doctor or psychologist testifying to a person's "gender identity," but the province set an age limit of 18 and over and said it needed more time to consider the issue.

Other human rights complaints have also been filed in at least three other provinces: British Columbia, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

Comments are not accepted due to the sensitive nature of this story.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Glenn January won't blame offensive line for first loss

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • A  young goose stuffed with bread from  St Vital park passers-by takes a nap in the shade Thursday near lunch  –see Bryksa’s 30 day goose challenge Day 29-June 28, 2012   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)
  • A monarch butterfly looks for nectar in Mexican sunflowers at Winnipeg's Assiniboine Park Monday afternoon-Monarch butterflys start their annual migration usually in late August with the first sign of frost- Standup photo– August 22, 2011   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Should the city grant mosquito buffer zones for medical reasons only?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google