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Cameras to catch action back on Earth

MONTREAL -- A Vancouver-based company says it should be ready to take videos of big outdoor events on Earth from the International Space Station and put them on the Internet by the end of the year.

Scott Larson, the CEO of Urthecast, said two space cameras -- one that shoots photos, the other video -- will be sent up to the station on Oct. 16 on board a Russian spacecraft.

The cameras will be installed on the outside of the football-field-sized station at the end of October and are expected to start rolling a few months later once tests are completed.

"Around the last couple of weeks of December or the first couple of weeks of January is when we'll be able to officially turn stuff on and start showing all the streaming images," Larson told The Canadian Press.

He said there will be about a one-hour delay before the images taken by the space station cameras show up on Urthecast's website, but there will be lots to feast on.

"Anything that's one metre big is what you'll be able to see," he said. "You'll see if there are 10 people together in white shirts in a green field.

The cameras will be able to show flash mobs, outdoor events, stadiums, boats and planes, but Larson added images such as people's faces and licence plates will be too small to be visible.

Canadian killed in plane crash

NASSAU, Bahamas -- A medical evacuation plane crashed early this morning in the Bahamas killing three people, including a Canadian citizen.

Local authorities said the plane crashed as the pilot tried to make a night landing at a small airstrip.

Police said the pilot was trying to land with the light of headlamps from two trucks driven up to the runway.

The plane's wing hit one truck and it spewed fuel as it spun into the second, which exploded, killing three people inside. The pilot survived.

The victims were identified as Edith Collie, 81, her daughter, Enamae Collie, who was in her 30s, and her husband, Canadian citizen Tim Polowick, originally from Saskatchewan. All the victims were residents of Mayaguana island.

Sidney Collie, the elderly woman's son, said they were trying to make the night landing because one of his uncles needed to be airlifted to the capital of Nassau for medical reasons.

Local night flying is banned on the smaller islands of the Bahamas, including Mayaguana, because airports do not have runway lights.

Robbery motive in Florida killings?

HALLANDALE BEACH, Fla. -- The slaying of a Canadian couple found dead in their winter home in Florida may have been motivated by robbery, police said Thursday.

Rochelle Wise's wedding band -- valued at $16,000 -- was missing from the couple's condo in Hallandale Beach, Fla., investigators said.

The ring is described as platinum finish with five half-carat white diamonds in a half-moon shape and police said it may be engraved with the letters DCC on the inside.

The band has an unusual locking mechanism that allows it to open and close so that it can fit over a knuckle, they said.

"We are hoping that if we find this ring it may lead us to more information," Hallandale Beach Police Chief Dwayne Flournoy told the Miami Herald.

Investigators are asking pawn shops and anyone who deals in used jewelry to keep an eye out for the ring.

It's the first clue to emerge regarding a possible motive in the deaths of Wise, 66, and David Pichosky, 71, whose bodies were found Jan. 10.

Police have described the killing as "senseless."

Wise and Pichosky were married about four years ago and her son has said they were just beginning to take advantage of their retirement.

Wise, a popular former day-camp director and educator, and Pichosky were at the local Jewish temple on Jan. 8 then went to a Walmart and returned home, police have said.

Settlement reached with veterans

OTTAWA -- The Federal Court has rubber-stamped an $887-million settlement of a class-action lawsuit involving thousands of disabled veterans.

The case involved a three-decade-long federal government practice of clawing back the military pensions of injured soldiers by the amount of disability payments they received.

Halifax resident and former army sergeant Dennis Manuge was the lead plaintiff in the case, which dragged its way through the courts for nearly five years, including a reference to the Supreme Court of Canada on a technicality.

The deal includes $424.3 million in retroactive payments to veterans dating back to 1976.

More than $82 million has been set aside to cover interest, while the rest of the settlement is an estimate of the amount the veterans will be owed in future.

The law firm that fought the case is in line for $35 million in fees associated with the case.

-- from the news services

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition April 5, 2013 A13

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