Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Public show poignant after police dog's death

  • Print
Edmonton police service dog Quanto was killed earlier this month while helping to capture a suspect involved in a pursuit.

HANDOUT / THE CANADIAN PRESS ARCHIVES Enlarge Image

Edmonton police service dog Quanto was killed earlier this month while helping to capture a suspect involved in a pursuit.

EDMONTON -- Edmonton police dogs and their handlers have performed public demonstrations before, but one on Sunday held special meaning following the fatal stabbing of one of the force's dogs earlier this month.

Many people brought their families to a public park in below-freezing temperatures to get an up-close look at the dogs and to express how much they appreciate them.

"It's sad, obviously, to hear of any kind of any kind of harm to an animal. But these kinds of dogs in particular, they put their lives on the line for all of us," said Wade Rooyakkers, who attended the demonstration with his children.

Quanto, a German shepherd, was stabbed to death Oct. 7 while trying to take down a man accused of fleeing a car with stolen plates.

Staff Sgt. Troy Carriere with the police department's canine unit said officers have been showered with support and sympathy from Edmonton and across Canada since Quanto's death and they wanted to hold the special demonstration to express their gratitude.

Carriere said the support from people has come in the form of emails, gifts at the kennels and support to the Edmonton Humane Society.

"Every night, my handlers go out to protect and serve the community, and now when we need the support over the last couple of weeks, the community has stepped up and supported us," Carriere said.

Handlers allowed the dogs to mingle with the crowd and gave permission to pet some of them.

One smiling toddler, in her mother's arms and wearing a purple parka, said, "Ruff! Ruff!" to one of the German shepherds.

The federal government said in its throne speech this month it will bring forward Quanto's Law to protect animals that work with police.

Police complained in Quanto's case the strongest criminal charge that could be laid was cruelty to an animal.

Carriere, who travelled to Ottawa in support of the proposed legislation, said current laws are meant to prosecute people who abuse or torture animals. He said the way they're worded, it's difficult to lay charges against someone who hurts or kills a service animal.

"In 2013, we've apprehended 260 criminals that would have gotten away," Carriere said.

"Without our dogs being able to do the jobs that they do, those guys are back on the street."

Supporters of a new law to protect police dogs weren't hard to find at the demonstration on Sunday.

"The canine unit is important to us. If we don't protect them, who's going to?" asked Tammy Krywiak, who owns several dogs, including a German shepherd guard dog.

Rooyakkers, meanwhile, said he was surprised when he found out there wasn't already a special law protecting police animals.

"These guys are considered police officers as far as I'm concerned," he said.

Quanto is the fifth Edmonton police dog to die in the line of duty. A police dog named Caesar was the last animal before Quanto, killed in 1998.

The throne speech did not specify what Quanto's Law would entail.

Paul Vukmanich faces a number of charges following Quanto's death, including dangerous driving, criminal flight, resisting arrest and cruelty to an animal.

 

-- The Canadian Press

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition October 28, 2013 A9

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Key of Bart - Take It Easy

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • The sun peers through the fog to illuminate a tree covered in hoar frost near Headingley, Manitoba Thursday- Standup photo- February 02, 2012   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)
  • A baby Red Panda in her area at the Zoo. International Red Panda Day is Saturday September 15th and the Assiniboine Park Zoo will be celebrating in a big way! The Zoo is home to three red pandas - Rufus, Rouge and their cub who was born on June 30 of this year. The female cub has yet to be named and the Assiniboine Park Zoo is asking the community to help. September 14, 2012  BORIS MINKEVICH / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Should Manitoba support the transport of nuclear waste through the province?

View Results

Ads by Google