The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION

Some left smiling with small budget goodies, a lot more left frowning

  • Print

OTTAWA - Tuesday's federal budget left a handful of Canadians with modest smiles and a lot of others with big frowns. Here's a brief roster of stakeholders mentioned in Finance Minister Jim Flaherty's fiscal blueprint and their likely facial expressions:

SMILING

— Low-income veterans and their families, who saw another $108 million put into a fund to help cover funeral costs;

— Veterans released from the military for medical reasons, because they get a hiring priority for public service jobs;

— Adoptive families, who get a higher tax credit for adoption costs;

— World-class amateur athletes, who get a break on their available RRSP room;

— Search and rescue volunteers, who get a tax credit similar to the one extended to volunteer firefighters in 2011;

— Students with cars who are seeking Canada Student Loans; the value of their vehicles will no longer affect their "needs assessment";

— The Conservative base of support, because the budget is on the verge of balance and is forecast to be in surplus in 2015.

FROWNING

— Smokers, who will see the excise duty on tobacco rise by $4 for a carton of 200 cigarettes;

— The Canadian Forces, their $3.1 billion in spending plans shoved into the future;

— Retired public servants, whose retirement health-plan costs are poised to double;

— Working public servants, who have been placed on notice that the road to a budget surplus runs through a pay freeze.

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Jim Flaherty remembered at visitation as irreplaceable

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • STDUP ‚Äì Beautiful West End  begins it's summer of bloom with boulevard s, front yards  and even back lane gardens ,  coming alive with flowers , daisies and poppies  dress up a backyard lane on Camden St near Wolseley Ave  KEN GIGLIOTTI  / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS  /  June 26 2012
  • Young goslings are growing up quickly near Cresent Lake in Portage La Prairie, Manitoba- See Bryksa 30 Day goose project- Day 11- May 15, 2012   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

What are you most looking forward to this Easter weekend?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google