Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Carrot cake, times two, tastes twice as good

  • Print
Today's column features two kinds of carrot cake, as requested by readers.

Barb Saindon was looking for a recipe like Costco's carrot cake with icing, and Marg Hazelwood had requested a carrot cake made with butter. Thanks to April Osnach of Teulon, who supplied the recipe for autumn carrot cake with cream cheese frosting, and to Helen Pitura who sent in the carrot crumb cake recipe, which she found in a 1978 Chatelaine cookbook. Thanks also to Lorna Lavallee and to Linda Snider of Glenboro.

Bob Pinnell had written earlier that he had lost the recipe book for his Regal bread machine. Thanks to Shelagh Poolie, who was able to supply him with a copy, and also to Shannon Friesen and Jo-Anne Joyce, who were all glad to help. Some time ago, Debbie Seier had requested Gurney recipes that were given out with Gurney stoves. Thanks to Isobel Basso of Shoal Lake, who was kind enough to share her collection with her.

New requests: Paula Eyford remembers a grilled cheese sandwich she had as a child from Eaton's Grill Room with cheese on the outside and bacon inside, and asks if anyone knows how to make them. She would also like to make the cheese sticks with Gouda that were sold at the Bagel House that used to be on Academy Road.

Autumn carrot cake

425 ml (1 3/4 cups) flour

10 ml (2 tsp) baking soda

10 ml (2 tsp) baking powder

10 ml (2 tsp) ground cinnamon

2 ml (1/2 tsp) allspice

2 ml (1/2 tsp) salt

.5 ml (1/8 tsp) ginger

375 ml (1 1/2 cups) sugar

250 ml (1 cup) mayonnaise or sour cream

3 eggs

500 ml (2 cups) shredded raw carrots

250 ml (8 oz) can crushed pineapple, drained

125 ml (1/2 cup) pecans or walnuts, chopped

Heat oven to 350 F. Grease bottom of a 13 x 9 x 2-inch pan. Combine flour, baking soda, baking powder and spices in a bowl. In another bowl, beat sugar, sour cream or mayonnaise and eggs. Gradually beat in flour mixture until batter is smooth. Stir in carrots, pineapple and nuts. Pour into pan and bake 30-35 minutes until toothpick comes out clean. Cool.

Cream cheese frosting

250 g (8 oz) pkg cream cheese

45 ml (3 tbsp) butter

2 ml (1/2 tsp) vanilla

.5 ml (1/8 tsp) salt

625 ml - 750 ml (2 1/2 - 3 cups) icing sugar

Beat until smooth.

Taste Tester Notes: This makes a super moist, nicely spiced and delicious cake. I used a dark pan, and as the cake was browning quickly, I turned the oven down to 325 F for the last few minutes, baking for a total of 30 minutes. Cool cake completely in pan on rack before icing. Beat room temperature cream cheese with butter, vanilla and salt, then gradually beat in icing sugar until desired consistency. I prefer a soft and creamy and not-too-sweet frosting, and used only 500 ml (2 cups) of icing sugar.

Carrot crumb cake

125 ml (1/2 cup) soft butter

250 ml (1 cup) sugar

1 egg

7 ml (1 1/2 tsp) vanilla

250 ml (1 cup) shredded raw carrots

500 ml (2 cups) pastry flour

10 ml (2 tsp) baking powder

5 ml (1 tsp) salt

1 ml (1/4 tsp) nutmeg

2 ml (1/2 tsp) baking soda

160 ml (2/3 cup) sour milk

Crumb topping

Beat the butter, sugar and egg together until fluffy. Stir in vanilla and shredded carrots. Sift dry ingredients together and add alternately with the sour milk. Spread in a greased 9 x 9-inch pan. Sprinkle with crumb topping and bake at 180 C (350 F) for 45 minutes.

Crumb topping

45 ml (3 tbsp) flour

80 ml (1/3 cup) brown sugar

5 ml (1 tsp) cinnamon

80 ml (1/3 cup) chopped walnuts or pecans

45 ml (3 tbsp) melted butter

Mix flour, sugar, cinnamon and chopped nuts together. Stir in melted butter to form a crumbly mixture.

Taste Tester Notes: This carrot cake is different from most, more of a coffee cake, and is moist and good, mildly spiced and with a nice topping. Check before suggested baking time; I used a dark pan and the cake was ready in just 30 minutes.

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition March 26, 2008 $sourceSection$sourcePage

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

Dustin Byfuglien reflects on season

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS 060711 Chris Pedersen breeds Monarch butterflies in his back yard in East Selkirk watching as it transforms from the Larva or caterpillar through the Chrysalis stage to an adult Monarch. Here an adult Monarch within an hour of it emerging from the Chrysalis which can be seen underneath it.
  • A Yellow-bellied Sapsucker hangs out on a birch tree in St. Vital. The Yellow-bellied Sapsucker is considered a keystone species. Other species take advantage of the holes that the birds make in trees. A group of sapsuckers are collectively known as a

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Do you agree with the province’s crackdown on flavoured tobacco products?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google