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Guide helps Manitobans to deal with governments

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The province's ombudsman has released a 28-page guide to help Manitobans resolve disputes with municipal and provincial government bodies.

The guide, Achieving Fairness: Your Guide to Dealing with Government, was created to help Manitobans who experience disagreements when dealing with government programs and services.

"Most of us use government programs or services on a regular basis - hydro, Autopac, transit, health care, building permits, and many others - and disagreements are bound to occur," acting ombudsman Mel Holley said in a release. "This guide is intended to provide people with some information and practical advice on how to deal with these disagreements in a constructive and proactive manner."

Achieving Fairness is split into four parts. Part one aims to show Manitobans how to deal with government bodies, while the other three sections give information on government decision-making, how to solve problems on your own and basic information about Manitoba’s ombudsman.

The guide is free and can be accessed by calling by calling 204-982-9130 or 1-800-665-0531.

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