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New techniques ID body: city man went missing in 1989

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The remains of a Winnipeg man who went missing in 1989 have been identified and now the RCMP are asking for the public’s help for information into his suspicious death.

The RCMP D Division Historical Case Unit announced today that Patrick Lawrence Rosner, 20, has been identified by using DNA from his family.

Rosner was last seen by co-workers leaving work at Bristol Aerospace in Winnipeg on June 23, 1989.

RCMP said a farmer found a human skull in his field near Faulkner on Aug. 13, 1990, but the science techniques of the day could only say the remains were likely from a 25 to 40-year-old woman.

After the RCMP Historical Case Unit examined the file, the remains were exhumed on Sept. 7, 2011, and sent for DNA analysis were it was determined the remains were from a man.

Investigators started looking for missing men around that time and reexamined Rosner’s case.

RCMP spokeswoman Sgt. Line Karpish said a degree of closure has been brought to the family, knowing that he is indeed dead.

There were unconfirmed reports in the weeks of Rosner's disappearance, that he was seen in South Carolina.

Karpish said now the family and police want to know how he died.

"Somebody knows something out there," Karpish said. "If you have any information, it's time to come forward.

"The family deserves to have answers," Karpish said. "This is a person with a mom and dad and family and friends."

Rosner's car, a red 1972 Valiant, was found abandoned near the Bristol Aerospace plant the day after he disappeared.

Karpish said there are no ready explanations for his disappearance: it's not believed he was involved in criminal activity. He had a girlfriend, was working full-time and had plans for the weekend before he disappeared.

The remains were buried in Ashern. Karpish said they will now be moved to Winnipeg where the family can hold a proper burial for him.

RCMP say the death is being treated as suspicious.

Anyone with any information is asked to call the RCMP Historical Case Unit at 204-984-6447 or Manitoba CrimeStoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS).

-- with files from Aldo Santin

History

Updated on Friday, August 10, 2012 at 10:56 AM CDT: adds more info on Rosner, calls from RCMP for more information

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