August 1, 2015


Local

Retired Mountie urges Manitobans to leave outdoor lights on in solidarity with Moncton

Retired RCMP officer Gordon Kowalchuk is calling on the people of Manitoba to show their support for the recovering city of Moncton.

Like many Canadians, Kowalchuk watched with bated breath as the RCMP searched day and night for shooting suspect Justin Bourque. The manhunt finally came to an end at 12:10 a.m. today.

Flowers near  the monument outside the RCMP D Division Headquarters on Portage Avenue commemorate the memory of the three Mounties killed and two others wounded in Moncton, N.B.

WAYNE GLOWACKI / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Flowers near the monument outside the RCMP D Division Headquarters on Portage Avenue commemorate the memory of the three Mounties killed and two others wounded in Moncton, N.B. Photo Store

Police had asked the citizens of Moncton to keep their outside lights on at all times during the search to try and help them find their suspect.

Kowalchuk said that from his 27 years of experience as a Mountie, he knows this small gesture can go a long way in helping police.

"As a police officer, when you have lights you have safety and security. When you can see what’s going on around you, there’s hope," he said.

Kowalchuk wants Manitobans to keep their outdoor lights on in solidarity with the rattled community of Moncton and the families of the fallen RCMP officers, until one day after the funeral services of the slain mounties.

"This is close to home for me. One of my partners from a neighbouring detachment where I worked once was Dennis Strongquill," said Kowalchuk.

Strongquill was a 20-year veteran RCMP officer who was killed while on the job in Russell, Manitoba in 2001.

"I know in situations like this I used to asked the question, ‘Why am I doing this?' Is what I do as a police officer important? Should I keep doing this?"

"At the memorial service that we had in Steinbach, there were people that came up to me afterwards and said, ‘Thank you,’ and that answered all the questions. Yes, it’s worthwhile. Let’s go to work tomorrow and keep going."

Kowalchuk came up with the idea for everyone to leave their lights on, but doesn’t want to be given any special credit.

"This isn’t about me, it’s about all the guys and girls working today from coast to coast," he said. "It’s about the moms and dads whose kids hop in a cruiser."

History

Updated on Friday, June 6, 2014 at 2:55 PM CDT: Corrects typo

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