Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Brewing some Jets pride

Special Budweiser beer made with Manitoba water

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Call it nectar from the hockey gods.

Starting Monday, Winnipeg Jets fans will be able to crack open their own "fan brew" as Budweiser launches a limited edition of its world-famous recipe made with Manitoba water.

Back during the euphoria of the Jets' home opener on Oct. 9, Budweiser took water from historical landmarks in Winnipeg, including The Forks, the MTS Centre and the Manitoba legislature, put it in a container and took it around town to be blessed by hockey fans.

Some of that water was even poured onto the ice surface at the MTS Centre by Jim Ludlow, president and CEO of True North Sports & Entertainment.

"In honour of the historical return of the Winnipeg jets, we have bottled the pride, passion and energy of all Jets fans in a commemorative fan brew," said Dan Chubey, district sales manager of Labatt Breweries of Canada, which produces Budweiser in Canada.

Just 24,000 two-fours of the fan brew have been produced and they'll be sold at about 100 beer vendors and MLCC locations beginning on Monday. The fan brew will be sold only in specially marked 12-can packages, each of which will come with a numbered certificate of authenticity. Chubey said he expects they'll be gone within a couple of weeks.

 

An exclusive launch will be held Thursday at the downtown Tavern United location.

Chubey said Budweiser fans wouldn't be able to tell the difference between a can of its regular beer and the fan brew.

"The brewing process for the fan brew is identical to the regular Budweiser brewing process. We took the water from Winnipeg and transported it to our brewery in Edmonton that has been brewing Budweiser for 30 years," he said.

There will also be an official toast of the beer by Jim Ludlow and Bary Benun, president of Labatt, during the second intermission of the Jets game against the Florida Panthers on March 1.

geoff.kirbyson@freepress.mb.ca

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition February 23, 2012 A2

History

Updated on Thursday, February 23, 2012 at 2:04 PM CST: adds colour photo, adds video

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