July 6, 2015


Local

Common interests can address bias

Dennis Lewycky, executive director, Social Planning Council of Winnipeg. Served in Botswana and Tanzania with CUSO in the 1970s.

Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press 
Lloyd and Sharon Small pose with son Kimon in their Brandon home. Kimon was adopted after being found as a toddler on the streets of Addis Ababa.

Phil Hossack / Winnipeg Free Press Lloyd and Sharon Small pose with son Kimon in their Brandon home. Kimon was adopted after being found as a toddler on the streets of Addis Ababa.

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"While in Africa I developed an understanding of the value of collaboration and co-operation within society. I saw first-hand how communities could overcome major adversities. I worked with women who showed me how common interests can address entrenched fear, ignorance and bias.

But the biggest lesson for me was that our quality of life is not measured by what we have or get or take from life, but what we put into it, what we contribute and what we do for others. This awareness sometimes puts me at odds with my own society, but in so many ways it has also created a rich and fulfilling life."

-- Compiled by John Longhurst

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition January 18, 2012 C5

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