Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Final welcome is the sweetest

Last of Canada's soldiers touch down

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Master Cpl. Adam McLeod greets his wife, Laurie, and son, Nolan, at Brandon's airport Tuesday.

TIM SMITH / BRANDON SUN Enlarge Image

Master Cpl. Adam McLeod greets his wife, Laurie, and son, Nolan, at Brandon's airport Tuesday.

BRANDON -- Weaving through a large crowd at the Brandon airport with his eyes firmly fixed on the prize, Adam McLeod gave his wife, Laurie, a huge kiss while simultaneously wrapping his arms around her and the couple's 19-month-old son.

McLeod, a soldier with the 2nd Battalion Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry at CFBàShilo, was one of the last soldiers to return from Afghanistan as the mission comes to an end.

"This is my fourth time coming home, but it's the first time coming home to my son and the first time being married so knowing that, and that it's the last time, it's a really good feeling," he said Tuesday.

In the last year, the couple has been together for a total of less than three weeks.

Their son, Nolan, sports long, dark, shaggy locks. While the hairstyle may be in style for the toddler, it bears more significance to his mother and father.

"He's missed so many firsts while he's been away serving in Afghanistan,"àLaurie said. "Tomorrow we're going to go to the base barber for his first haircut and his dad is going to be there to see it."

Laurie said she was going through a range of emotions as she finally welcomed her husband home. "Iàam very excited, I'm anxious and proud, happy, over the moon, and relief because I will have help."

Lee Hammond, deputy commander of Canada's contribution to the final Operation Attention, was also aboard the flight. While he was continuing on to Edmonton, he got off the plane to speak about the mission.

"We're leaving at the right time. We got the mission where it needs to be and our contributions were quite significant given the fair small number of soldiers we committed to this task,"àHammond said.

The conflict, which started in 2002 shortly after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the United States, cost the lives of 158 Canadian soldiers, two civilian contractors, a diplomat and a journalist.

Its success will now be largely measured by the effectiveness of the Afghan National Security Force, army, police and air force to maintain order in the Middle Eastern country.

Hammond said upcoming democratic elections will be an important milestone in Afghanistan's history. While the milestones are important, Hammond said there are challenges.

"We've given Afghanistan the tools to succeed in the future,"àHammond said. "In some elements of the Afghanistan government there are challenges with corruption."

Kandahar was one of the main battlegrounds for the Canadian Forces during the conflict. Hammond pointed to a recent trip to the city by Maj.-Gen. Dean Milner and Canada's ambassador Deborah Lyons as proof of how far the city has come.

Discussions used to strictly revolve around security in the Kandahar region, but now the talking points are moving away from violence and more toward the economy, education and modern infrastructure.

"It is extremely encouraging from a Canadian point of view because we invested so much time, resources and lives in Kandahar,"àHammond said.

Other areas, such as the eastern border with Pakistan remain quite hostile, but Hammond said it is now up to the Afghan forces and people to dictate their own future.

 

-- Brandon Sun

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition March 19, 2014 0

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