Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Heritage-structures bylaw gets upgrade

Expands protection beyond just buildings

  • Print
New bylaw could have protected vacant lot next to St. Boniface Museum (above).

TREVOR HAGAN / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES Enlarge Image

New bylaw could have protected vacant lot next to St. Boniface Museum (above). Photo Store

It took more than a decade of meetings, but the city is close to having a new bylaw to protect historical buildings and other heritage structures.

The historical resources bylaw, intended to take effect June 1, would see a listing of the features of a building the city aims to protect replacing the current system, which lists buildings from grades one to three, with three requiring the lowest protection. The current bylaw was enacted in 1977.

Jennifer Hansell, the city's senior urban planner, said having three grades of protection is ambiguous and the new system will "be more of a level playing field" and allow the city to protect more than just buildings.

Hansell said it could include parks, cemeteries and bridges.

The bylaw was approved by the civic committee on downtown development, heritage and riverbank management on Monday. It next goes to the city's executive policy committee before going to city council for a vote.

Another change would allow the public to sit in on meetings of the historical buildings committee, with the agendas published online, but citizens would not be able to state their views until a recommendation reached the standing committee.

Coun. Jenny Gerbasi, chairwoman of the historical buildings committee, said it took 12 years of meetings and public hearings to get the new bylaw rolling.

"It really is a lot clearer now for building owners," she said.

"The owners of the building will know what elements are protected. If it is designated, then it is valuable."

Cindy Tugwell, Heritage Winnipeg's executive director, said she's pleased with the new bylaw.

"With the (current) bylaw, councillors would say 'we'll save a grade 1 building but a grade 3, we really don't care,' " Tugwell said.

"This takes away the grading and forces the city to put down the character-defining elements. It needs to be what is it about this building. To me, the advantageous part is getting the city to identify these elements.

"I see this as a renewed opportunity to bring forward heritage."

Tugwell said the new bylaw could have helped with some past controversial decisions, including building a condominium next to the St. Boniface Museum.

"Had the vacant lot next to the St. Boniface Museum been designated as protected green space, it could have been protected under this bylaw," she said.

kevin.rollason@freepress.mb.ca

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition May 6, 2014 B2

Fact Check

Fact Check

Have you found an error, or know of something we’ve missed in one of our stories?
Please use the form below and let us know.

* Required
  • Please post the headline of the story or the title of the video with the error.

  • Please post exactly what was wrong with the story.

  • Please indicate your source for the correct information.

  • Yes

    No

  • This will only be used to contact you if we have a question about your submission, it will not be used to identify you or be published.

  • Cancel

Having problems with the form?

Contact Us Directly
  • Print

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

You can comment on most stories on winnipegfreepress.com. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press print or e-edition subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective April 16, 2010.

letters

Make text: Larger | Smaller

LATEST VIDEO

On the job with sea lion researchers

View more like this

Photo Store Gallery

  • A young goose   reaches for long strands of grass Friday night near McGillvary Blvd-See Bryksa 30 Day goose challenge- Day 19 - May 23, 2012   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)
  • Jia Ping Lu practices tai chi in Assiniboine Park at the duck pond Thursday morning under the eye of a Canada goose  - See Bryksa 30 Day goose challenge Day 13- May 17, 2012   (JOE BRYKSA / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)

View More Gallery Photos

Poll

Should the federal government force band chiefs and councillors to disclose their salary information?

View Results

View Related Story

Ads by Google